FRENCH OPEN Tennis Schedule, Information and Records

Stats Thru 2015 French Open

2016 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Site: Stade Roland Garros, Paris, France
Dates:
Sun., May 22 - Sun., June 5, 2016
Qualifying Matches Schedule: Tues., May 16- Fri., May 20
Main Draw: Announced on-site Fri., May 20 10am
Main Draw Begins Sun., May 22 (First round played Sunday, Monday and Tuesday)

US Television:
Tennis Channel, NBC (weekends + finals)
Live streaming: TBA
Singles Winner: 2.0M (EURO)

Points Breakdown:
 
ATP
WTA
Winner
2000
2000
Finalist
1200
1400
Semi
720
900
Quarter
360
500
4th RD
200
280
3rd RD
90
160
2nd RD
45
100
1st RD
10
5

Click for the French Open Homepage 


 

MEN'S FRENCH OPEN TENNIS STATISTICS


SINGLES TITLE LEADERS
9 - Rafael Nadal (2005-08,10-14)
6 - Bjorn Borg (1974, '75, '78-'81)
4 - Henri Cochet (1926 '28, '30, '32)
3 - Gustavo Kuerten (1997, 2000-01)
3 - Rene Lacoste (1925, '27, '29)
3 - Ivan Lendl (1984, '86, '87)
3 - Mats Wilander (1982, '85, '88)

MOST TITLES, ALL EVENTS
9 - Henri Cochet (1926-32), 4 singles, 3 doubles, 2 mixed
9 - Rafael Nadal (2005-08,10-14), 9 singles
8 - Jean Borotra (1925-36), 1 singles, 5 doubles, 2 mixed
8 - Roy Emerson (1960-67), 2 singles, 6 doubles

TITLES BY COUNTRY
17 - Spain
11 - Australia
11 - United States
10 - France
10 - Sweden
7 - Czechoslovakia


MOST CONSECUTIVE TITLES
5 - Rafael Nadal (10-14)

DOUBLES TITLE LEADER
6 - Roy Emerson
OPEN ERA MATCH WIN LEADERS
Rafael Nadal 70-2
Roger Federer 65-16
Guillermo Vilas 56-17
Ivan Lendl 53-12
Andre Agassi 51-15
Bjorn Borg 49-2
Novak Djokovic 48-11
Mats Wilander 47-9
Jim Courier 40-9
Yannick Noah 40-12
David Ferrer 40-13
Jimmy Connors
40-13

YOUNGEST CHAMPIONS

Michael Chang, 1989 (17 yrs, 3 mos)
Mats Wilander, 1982 (17 yrs, 9 mos)
Bjorn Borg, 1974, (18 yrs, 0 mos)


OLDEST CHAMPIONS
Andreas Gimeno, 1972 (34 yrs, 10 mos)
Ken Rosewall, 1968, (33 yrs, 7 mos)
Frank Parker, 1949 (33 yrs, 4 mos)

 

JUNIOR-SENIOR WINNERS
Rosewall (junior: 1952; senior: 1953 and 1968).
Emerson (junior: 1954; senior: 1963 and 1967).
Gimeno (junior: 1955; senior: 1972).
Lendl (junior: 1978; senior: 1984, 1986, 1987).
Wilander (junior: 1981 ; senior: 1982, 1985, 1988).

LONGEST MATCHES
In games-
Before the introduction of the tie-break, Sturgress d. McGregor (semi-finals, 1955), 76 games (10/8, 7/9, 8/6, 5/7, 9/7).
Since the introduction of the tie-break (1973), Agenor d. Prinosil (2nd round, 1994), 71 games (6/7, 6/7, 6/3, 6/4, 14/12), Santoro d. Clement (1st round 2004), 71 games (6/4, 6/3, 6/7, 3/6, 16/14).
In time-
Santoro b. Clement (1st round 2004), 6h33 (6/4, 6/3, 6/7, 3/6, 16/14).

UNSEEDED CHAMPIONS
Bernard (1946), Wilander (1982), Kuerten (1997), Gaudio (2004).

 

RECENT MEN'S FRENCH OPEN CHAMPIONS
     
YEAR/WINNER FINALIST SCORE
2015 Stan Wawrinka Novak Djokovic 46 64 63 64
2014 Rafael Nadal Novak Djokovic 36 75 62 64
2013 Rafael Nadal David Ferrer 63 62 63
2012 Rafael Nadal Novak Djokovic 64 63 26 75
2011 Rafael Nadal Roger Federer 75 76 57 61
2010 Rafael Nadal Robin Soderling 64 62 64
2009 Roger Federer Robin Soderling 61 76 64
2008 Rafael Nadal Roger Federer 61 63 60
2007 Rafael Nadal Roger Federer 63 46 63 64
2006 Rafael Nadal Roger Federer 16 61 64 76(4)
2005 Rafael Nadal Mariano Puerta 67(6) 63 61 75
2004 Gaston Gaudio Guillermo Coria 06 36 64 61 86
2003 Juan Carlos Ferrero Martin Verkerk 61 63 62
2002 Albert Costa Juan Carlos Ferrero 61 60 46 63
2001 Gustavo Kuerten Alex Corretja 67 75 62 60
2000 Gustavo Kuerten Magnus Norman 62 63 26 76
1999 Andre Agassi Andrei Medvedev 16 26 64 63 64
1998 Carlos Moya Alex Corretja 63 75 63
1997 Gustavo Kuerten Sergi Bruguera 63 64 62
1996 Yevgeny Kafelnikov Michael Stich 76 75 76
1995 Thomas Muster Michael Chang 75 62 64
1994 Sergi Bruguera Alberto Berasategui 63 75 26 61
1993 Sergi Bruguera Jim Courier 64 26 62 36 63
1992 Jim Courier Petr Korda 75 62 61
1991 Jim Courier Andre Agassi 36 64 26 61 64
1990 Andres Gomez Andre Agassi 63 26 64 64
1989 Michael Chang Stefan Edberg 61 36 46 64 62
1988 Mats Wilander Henri Leconte 75 62 61
1987 Ivan Lendl Mats Wilander 75 62 36 76
1986 Ivan Lendl Mikael Pernfors 63 62 64
1985 Mats Wilander Ivan Lendl 36 64 62 62
 

Australian Open-Roland Garros double

1933 Jack Crawford
1938 Don Budge
1953 Ken Rosewall
1956 Lew Hoad
1962 Rod Laver
1963 Roy Emerson
1967 Roy Emerson
1969 Rod Laver
1988 Mats Wilander
1992 Jim Courier

Most titles same Grand Slam (men and women)

Player Grand Slam Titles Years
Margaret Court Australian Open* 11 1960-66, 1969-71, 1973
M Navratilova Wimbledon 9 1978-79, 1982-87, 1990
Rafael Nadal Roland Garros 9 2005-08, 2010-2014


WOMEN'S FRENCH OPEN TENNIS STATISTICS

TOTAL TITLES LEADER
Smith-Court, 13 titles (5 singles, 4 doubles, 4 mixed doubles).

SINGLES TITLE LEADERS
Evert, 7 titles
Graf, 6 titles.

MOST CONSECUTIVE SINGLES TITLES
Henin, Wills-Moody, Sperling and Seles, 3

DOUBLES TITLES LEADERS
Navratilova, 7 titles.

SINGLES TITLES BY COUNTRY
USA: 29 titles.
Germany: 10 titles.

SINGLES MATCH WIN LEADER

Graf, 94 matches, 84 wins, 10 losses.

YOUNGEST CHAMPION
Seles (1990): 16 and 6 months.
Sanchez (1989): 17 and 5 months.
Graf (1987): 17 and 11 months.

OLDEST CHAMPION
Kormoczy (1958): 33
Serena Williams (2015): 33 and 8 months
Serena Williams (2013): 31 and 8 months
Adamson-Landry (1948): 31 and 6 months
Evert (1986): 31 and 5 months.

 

JUNIOR-SENIOR WINNERS
Dürr (junior: 1960; senior: 1967).
Jausovec (junior: 1973; senior: 1977).
Mandlikova (junior: 1978; senior: 1981).
Capriati (junior: 1989; senior: 2001).
Henin-Hardenne (junior: 1997; senior: 2003).

LONGEST MATCHES
In games-
Before the introduction of the tie-break, Mortimer d. Knode (1955), 38 games (2/6, 7/5, 10/8).
Since the introduction of the tie-break (1973), Graf d. Sanchez (1996), 40 games (6/3, 6/7, 10/8).
In time-
Graf d. Sanchez (1996), 3 h 04 (6/3, 6/7, 10/8).

UNSEEDED CHAMPIONS
Scriven (1933).




RECENT WOMEN'S FRENCH OPEN CHAMPIONS
       

YEAR

WINNER

FINALIST

SCORE

2015 Serena Williams Lucie Safarova 63 67(2) 62
2014 Maria Sharapova Simona Halep 64 67(5) 64
2013 Serena Williams Maria Sharapova 64 64
2012 Maria Sharapova Sara Errani 63 62
2011 Li Na Francesca Schiavone 64 76
2010 Francesca Schiavone Sam Stosur 64 76
2009 Svetlana Kuznetsova Dinara Safina 64 62
2008 Ana Ivanovic Dinara Safina 64 63
2007 Justine Henin Ana Ivanovic 61 62
2006 Justine Henin Svetlana Kuznetsova 64 64
2005 Justine Henin Mary Pierce 61, 61
2004 Anastasia Myskina Elena Dementieva 61, 62
2003 Justine Henin Kim Clijsters 60, 64
2002 Serena Williams Venus Williams 75 63
2001 Jennifer Capriati Kim Clijsters 16 64 1210
2000 Mary Pierce Conchita Martinez 62 75
1999 Steffi Graf Martina Hingis 46 75 62
1998 Arantxa Sanchez Monica Seles 76 06 62
1997 Iva Majoli Martina Hingis 64 62
1996 Steffi Graf Aranxta Sanchez 63 67 108
1995 Steffi Graf Arantxa Sanchez 75 46 60
1994 Arantxa Sanchez Mary Pierce 64 64
1993 Steffi Graf Mary Joe Fernandez 46 62 64
1992 Monica Seles YUG Steffi Graf GER 62 36 108
1991 Monica Seles YUG Arantxa Sanchez ESP 63 64
1990 Monica Seles YUG Steffi Graf GER 76 64
   
 

Some History...

Roland-Garros, a never-ending story
How did Roland-Garros come to be? Why is it named after an aviator? In what year was the tournament first held? Who are the legends of the game to have inscribed their name on the Coupe des Mousquetaires trophy? We take a fond look back at the long and glorious history of the world's greatest clay-court championship.

Way back when…
The stadium that stages one of the world's four major tennis tournaments was built in 1928, but the French men's singles championship goes back much further than that. Originally reserved for members of French clubs, it was first held on the courts of Stade Français club in Paris in 1891. The women's singles were added six years later, it was not until 1925 that the French Tennis Federation decided to open the event to the best foreign players. Thus, the French Internationals were born, and staged alternately at Stade Français and Racing Club de France until the Roland-Garros stadium came into being in 1928.

These Musketeers need a stadium!
1927 was a milestone for French tennis, the year the celebrated French Musketeers (Jacques "Toto" Brugnon, Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet and René Lacoste) pulled off one of the biggest shocks in 20th century sport. The famous foursome upset all the odds by winning the Davis Cup on American soil, and in doing so set up a rematch in 1928, in Paris. Obviously, such a major sporting occasion required a stadium worthy of its stature, and so it was that the Stade Français handed over three hectares of land near Porte d'Auteuil to the French Tennis Federation. The only condition to the offer of land was that the new stadium should bear the name of one of Stade Français' most renowned former members, Roland-Garros, who had died some ten years earlier. Roland-Garros was an aviation pioneer who, on 23 September 1913, had become the first man to fly a plane over the Mediterranean. The 1928 French Internationals were the first event to be held in the new stadium, just before the Musketeers took centre-stage to beat the Americans in their long-awaited rematch.

The post-war period: a golden era beckons
The Musketeers held on to the Davis Cup for another five years, only giving up the famous silver salad bowl in 1933, by which time the French Internationals at Roland-Garros had well and truly established themselves as a major international tournament. Cancelled from 1940 to 1945 due to the Second World War, Roland-Garros went from strength to strength in the post-war period, reflecting tennis' growth into a hugely popular sport-for-all. Another significant turning point came in 1968 when the French Internationals became the first Grand Slam tournament to join the "Open" era. Professionalism brought with it yet more expansion and excitement.

 

 

 

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