Djokovic Nets Fish for ATP Indian Wells Title; American Back in Mix
by Richard Vach | March 23rd, 2008, 8:22 pm
  • 71 Comments

Watch out Roger Federer. Novak Djokovic is coming to get you.


On Sunday the rangy Serb outlasted a determined Mardy Fish 6-2, 5-7, 6-3 to win his second title of the year after the Australian Open at the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, Calif.

Fish, seemingly perpetually serving himself out of 0-30 holes during the match, somehow stretched the match to three sets before Djokovic displayed his champion’s mentality.

Djokovic began the third set by dropping into a 0-40 hole, only to serve his way out of trouble in an impressive display with three consecutive aces. Fish couldn’t seem to recover from failing to break serve in the opening game, losing his first serve of the third set straight-away, and playing catch-up for the remainder of the set until the Serb served it out at 5-3.

“There is something in this desert air which keeps me going year after year,” Djokovic said. “I am doing pretty good here…I also want to congratulate Mardy on a fantastic week. Obviously, his ranking is not good enough. He’s a much better player than that and deserves to be ranked much higher.”

Fish beat three Top 10 players at Indian Wells, including a stunning straight-set shellacking of world No. 1 Roger Federer in the semifinals.

“This has been a tremendous week for me, definitely one I will never forget,” Fish said. “Yesterday was one of the best days of my life and this is my favorite tournament.”

Throughout the event, with off-again on-again coach Kelly Jones in his player’s box, Fish played first-strike tennis, cutting back on the serve-and-volleying and opting to take a big crack at his opponent’s first offering. It worked to perfection against Federer in the semifinals, where at times Fish could seemingly do no wrong. In the final against Djokovic, Fish was mentally up and down, sometimes forgetting his game plan, but then playing his best tennis when he was down, crackling his much-improved forehand and keeping Djokovic scrambling to stay in points.

The world No. 3 Djokovic doesn’t gain a whole lot of ground on the world No. 1 Federer as he was a runner-up at Indian Wells in 2007. Likewise next week he begins his defense of his Miami title, but Djokovic is clearly sending a message to Federer, who he intends to go mano-a-mano (or is it mono-a-mono?) in 2008.

For Fish, the week’s worth of excitement won’t be enough for U.S. Davis Cup coach Patrick McEnroe to consider him for the upcoming U.S. vs. France tie, but it will be enough to consider him for future ties, depending on the results of current American No. 2 James Blake.

Credit coach Kelly Jones for fixing Fish’s flighty forehand wing, which consistently broke down on big occasions? Regardless, the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami will be the venue to see if Fish can parlay his momentum into a fish platter or upgrade bonus meal with fries and large drink. Or any other “fish” headline of clever take you can think of. Go Fish.


Also Check Out:
Roddick and Fish Rolling in Indian Wells — in Doubles?
Nadal, Djokovic Leads Seeds Today at Indian Wells
No Joke, a Fish Swallows Federer Whole in Indian Wells Desert
To Rest His Knees, Rafael Nadal Might Not Play Indian Wells
An Earthquake Hit Indian Wells This Morning, Here’s How It Looked On The Tennis Channel (With Player Reaction) [Video]

Don't miss any tennis action, stay connected with Tennis-X

Get Tennis-X news FREE in your inbox every day

71 Comments for Djokovic Nets Fish for ATP Indian Wells Title; American Back in Mix

Shital Green Says:

Here is what Djoko had to say in today’s post-match interview. “I’m coming closer, though, to second place in the world and people have started talking about three players instead of two now, which is encouraging and a great thing for me. But I’m still not thinking of myself as the best player in the world.”

One step at a time. He is not making a leap in his thought process into No. 1 position, but No.2. That is the next target and is not very far if he continues to be consistent. A day before, he had to say this, “But I need to stay calm and just go step by step and try to get to my lifetime goal which is to be No. 1. It’s getting closer, but still, I don’t want to go too fast and skip some things. I really need to be consistent with my results in the most important events, major events.”
I give Federer credit here because once he challenged Djoko to show consistency and then talk big. So Djoko takes the advice seriously and has started to show some consistency (his results this year are better than last year, and he is inching every day to the mark), and also he is learning to talk small. With maturity, his “cockiness” is tapering into something humbled pragmaticism. I am happy to see this growth in him.


bob22 Says:

Shital, you can’t be serious. You have no clue what you are saying. First tennis is competitive sport where each player’s goal is to win and move up. Federer is just a human not a God, as some people were making of him. This type of support hurts him the most! It is not just Novak, every player has a right to beleive in themself and to predict thier success. At age of 17 when he was facing Federer he did said that he will won, but this is not sign of “cockines” insted is sigh of his youngster age. His only problem was that his later predictions were correct.
I wish to Federer and Sharapova early recovery with all other tennis players out there that are making this sport so sucesfull!


naresh Says:

Federer’s domination has ended period.Djokovic is definitely on his way to being the No.1 player in the world. he’s beating not only the top players in the world, but also the players who are in the form of their life, like Tsonga & Fish. i think he’s gonna get to the finals of Roland Garros too .

Just a thought..wonder what Federers critics have to say about the 5 yrs of Federer’s dominance though..fluke, no real competition ??!!!


Spirit Says:

I couldn’t believe what I was seeing in the Fed-Fish semi. Federer seemed soooo slow and without any interest in the match. He was 1/2 step behind the ball, and it seemed as he just wanted the match to be over… he has lost many matches, but I have never seen him so easily beaten and so helpless/powerless.

About Novak, just one little point about his strength – 1:1 sets, 0:0 games, 0:40 ===> 3 ACES!!! Novak is “tomorrow’s Fed”.

I’m a bit sorry for Nadal. The bloke deserved at least a couple weeks at No.1. It seems now that Fed and Novak will just switch places, leaving Nadal #2 for good…


st4r5 Says:

Two things which have not been there with Roger as they used to. Firstly, Roger’s ability to hit deadly return serve, secondly, Roger’s ability to read what his opponent is going to do next. This ability is very important to set up points, at the moment, it seems like his mind is not with him so he moves after the ball is hit, and not before, and even when he gets there, he doesn’t know what to do with it, he is not sure where to put the ball in. Knowing where to put the ball in with such conviction, has something to do with court and opponent’s position awareness and ability to read where the opponent is going to move next. These two things are no longer with Roger now, that’s why sometimes he is late to get to the ball, and that’s why he cannot hit deadly return serve, I hope he will rediscover these abilities again.


Daniel Says:

The first sentence was supposed to be “Watch out Rafael Nadal. Novak Djokovic is coming to get you.”

I’ve been saying this for ages. Nadal will loose number 2 before getting n. 1.

He has to defend 2775 points between Miami and Roland Garros (counting both), and can only make more 525 points IF he wins Miami and Hamburgo.
This means that if Djokovic gets at least to Miami final and 2 more in the clay season, any slip by Nadal not deffending a clay MS title will cost him his rankings.
Djoko even have the vantage of only facing Nadal in the semis, which can give him points since last year he didn’t make any in the MS events.

After the French (which I think Nadal won’t win) a new number 2 will rise. Or, it could be sooner!


Dr. Death Says:

The song remains the same over every decade of tennis. We see greats emerge and then others come along to challenge them and, eventually, replace them.

We are in one of those periods now and that means exciting tennis for the fans. The best thing that could happen to us is to have four or five different people slugging it out with different champions emerging at the tournaments coming up.

The French and Wimbledon will be at fever pitch at that point.


Maja Says:

I’m so happy for Novak, he’s really a great tennis player..

I love Fish too – he seems like a good sport and a person full of emotions… he has a tennis talent he just have to learn how to make less mistakes


Shital Green Says:

Daniel,
That is about right. Djokovic is just 425 points behind Nadal, striking distance. If Nadal loses one of those MS that he has to defend in early rounds, and Djoko wins a new one, Nadal will be ousted then and there.

Yet, at another favorable scenario, Nadal could be taking the helm of No. 1 by Wimbledon, if he defends/wins some and Fed loses in early rounds in some of the tournaments happening between now and then. It is possible Nadal could be there, though difficult.

Had Djoko not choked and won that US Open last year, he would have been a lot closer. Now, since that did not happen, he will have to wait until the US Open to see the signs of becoming No. 1, which might and might not happen this year. It not only depends on his performance but also on his arch rivals’. Djoko is more likely gain than the other two: He just got to quarters in 2 MS last year; it looks like he will gain more points on clay this year. But he has to get to RG semi to keep his points. Nadal has 1350 to defend on clay alone, which could be difficult. Federer has only 925 to defend on clay, which should not be a problem unless he is already dysfunctional.

It will be definitely interesting to watch Djoko, Nadal and Fed keeping within finals and semis in all the majors and keeping themselves within a couple of hundred points, at least for about a year or two.


Kash Says:

“Nadal has 1350 to defend on clay alone, which could be difficult. Federer has only 925 to defend on clay, which should not be a problem unless he is already dysfunctional. ”

>>>> Nadal has 1000 points to defend at RG, 500 at each of MC and Rome. 350 at hamburg, 300 at barcelona and 250 at stuttgart. Even if you ignore stuttgart, that is 2650 points between miami and Wimbledon. What kind of weird points are these that rafa has 1350 to defend of?

Federer has 350 at MC 500 at Hamburg and 700 at french. That amounts to 1550. I have no clue how you got that 925. Chokovic has 975 points to defend in the same period. There is a crazy chance that he can become no.1 by the end of RG if the mono continues to plague federer and nadal’s eyes malfunction and he sees the red clay as the blue hardcourts.

The most likely scenario of all is that Rafa defends his points on clay like only he can and Fedz mono keeps him off his meticulous physical prep he has been known for, since the beginning of 04. This is in no way related to potito starace’s fierce rise through the clay season, who i am sure will join the likes of fish, volandri and murray as the only players other than rafa/nalbandian to have dismantled the intricacies of the fed-game.

Chokovic is the real joker in the pack. Right now he is a marked man and everyone will be gunning for him during the clay season and we will get a peek at how realistic a shot he will have at the french in the coming years. He is untested commodity on clay and grass. If he does better than last year on clay and grass, he may get to no.1 by the end of wimbledon. If he slips on the clay Rafa will be the no.1 by the end of french. Then it will be musical chairs between fed, nadal and the choker.


Daniel Says:

Kash

I think she wasn’t counting RG, only the MS.

Shital

Yes, it is possible. But not really realistic, only if Fed is really that bad and loose before QF in RG and Wimbledon, which let’s face it, very unlikable!

The n°1 is in Fed’s control. Nadal has little to gain and a lot to defend. Fed could surpass 7000 points going into RG if he improves his performance in Miami and Rome, and the extra points playing in Estoril where he is scheduled. Btw, Djokovic has to defend his title in Estoril last year. Would it be interest to see a clay Fed x Djoko final!

Right now Fed has more than 800 points then Nadal and I am not counting that he will repeat 2006 clay season, loosing only finals to Nadal, but assuming he hasn’t get his old form back, he still can stay in some quarters, semis and finals protecting his ranking. These players even when in a dark phase they manage to get some wins. The same will happen with Nadal. I don’t think he will win RG this year but I don’t see him loosing before QF ever, only if Nalbandian stay in his draw. In fact this scenario is possible since Nadal is n. 2 and Nalby n. 7. It will be a spectacular match!


jane Says:

Shital Green,

” I am happy to see this growth in him.” Me too – but I like that Djokovic says what’s on his mind and kind of does his own thing. It’s good that there are several different personalities in the top ten of the ATP; it keeps the game interesting.


Bob22 Says:

Kash, do you have problem with proper typing of Novak’s last name? If not that type it correctly!


jane Says:

For Fish fans – at ESPN Peter Bodo has written up a nice article on Mardy being back in the mix too. I really do hope he carries his momentum into the rest of the season. Since he’s got virtually no points to defend for most of the year, he could certainly climb the ranks.


Shital Green Says:

Daniel,
Thanks for clarifying.
The clay points I counted was before RG and included only Masters Series.
Federer: Monte Carlo 350+ Rome 75+ Hamburg 500=925
Nadal: MC 500 + Rome 500 + Hamburg 350 = 1350
Djokovic: MC 75 + Rome 125 + Hamburg 125 =325

If we include all clay court points for the 3 players, we get
(1) Nadal will have to defend 1350+1000 (RG) +550 (Casablanca & Stuttgart)= 2900 pts.
(2) Djoko 325+ 450 (RG) +200 (Estoril)= 975
(3) Fed 925+700+ (RG)= 1625

And I believe that Djoko will somehow defend his 975 on clay, even if he has to play a couple of extra tournaments on clay.

jane,
Make no mistake I do like his spontaneous self.


penise Says:

FED “SO WANTS” TO BE LENNY KRAVITZ. FUNNY QUOTE BUT IT REVEALS WHAT IS GOING ON WITH THE FED –BURN OUT PURE AND SIMPLE! JOKER SHOULD SHOOT FOR THE GRAND SLAM – - WHY NOT?


Von Says:

Dr. Death:

“The best thing that could happen to us is to have four or five different people slugging it out with different champions emerging at the tournaments coming up.”

Thank God. I’ve been preaching about the lack of variety in champions and unpredictability of the tournaments, wherein it was the same name that kept coming up, even if we had put the names in a hat and pulled out the winner, — it would still have been Federer. Now the uncertainty, is what has sparked renewed interest in tennis and there’s no longer the foregone conclusion that Federer will emerge as the winner. Tennis is in for a roller coaster turn of events. There’s nothing like the changing of the guard to mend those broken spirits.

“Though this be madness, yet there is method in ‘t.”. AND
“That it should come to this!”. **** Absolutely smashing! :)


jane Says:

Can Djokovic win Miami too?

I hope he can, since he’s defending Champion. However, it’s always tough to follow up big wins, week in week out, back-to-back. That’s why the players who do it and have done it are special, whether it’s on all surfaces or simply one.

Not many players have completed the coast-to-coast Masters Series set, and Djok will have another deep field to navigate through.

Looking forward to seeing the draw, as usual.


jane Says:

On the other hand, a surprise winner and/or finalist is always fun too. ;-)


Shital Green Says:

I found the Miami draw more balanced than the last one. Let me hear your opinions, guys.

Fed has to pass through Monfils or Isner in the 2nd; winner of Wawrinka vs Soderling/ Koubek in the 3rd; and he could be facing Hewitt or Robredo in the 4th. In the quarter final, he could meet Tsonga /Karlovic /Roddick. In the semi, Murray or Youzhny could be waiting for him.

Until Gonzalez in the 4th, Djoko does not seem to be have any serious challenger unless a qualifier surprises him. But in the quarter, Gasquet or Berdych could pose some threat to him.

Nadal should not have difficulty passing through Roitman, Kiefer, Nieminen, Haas, or Mathieu unless Cilic or Mahut causes an upset in the 4th. Nalbandian or Blake could be waiting for him in the quarter, though. Then, in the semi, Djoko could once again deny him the final spot.


Skorocel Says:

Spirit said: “I couldn’t believe what I was seeing in the Fed-Fish semi. Federer seemed soooo slow and without any interest in the match. He was 1/2 step behind the ball, and it seemed as he just wanted the match to be over… he has lost many matches, but I have never seen him so easily beaten and so helpless/powerless.”

Totally agree. When you compare Mardy’s poor 1st serve percentage with the final result, it indicates 2 things:

1. Fish must’ve played well
2. Fed must’ve played a TOTAL cr.p

To be honest, I’m not that worried by Fed’s cr.ppy play… That would be still OK as he’s only a human, isn’t he? I’ve already seen him play like this a couple of times in 2007 (for example against Volandri in Rome or against Seppi in Monte Carlo). What I’m really worried about is his unbelievable slowness and also his absolute disinterest which we had the chance to witness in that semi vs Mardy. I can tell you I’ve seen literally hundreds of his matches (followed him virtually since he’s won his first GS title at Wimby in 2003), but I can guarantee you I’ve NEVER seen him as slow as in that Saturday’s match… NEVER!


jane Says:

The slowness could be due to the mono and the extreme heat of the desert. That’s something easily ameliorated, once he is well, in milder climates, and/or when he works on it. If Fed was one of my faves, and if what you say is true Skorocel, I’d be more worried about the disinterest, since there are a bunch of players “chompin at the bit”, and very, very interested in winning.


jane Says:

Shital Green,

“I found the Miami draw more balanced than the last one. Let me hear your opinions, guys.”

Yeah, that draw has a good spread to it; but that may be due to the fact that we now know almost anyone can win! I think Andy Murray’s got a pretty negotiable quarter and even half of the draw. This is a good chance for him to get deep into the tournament, I’d think. Rafa’s got Blake, which might be tough for him, but Tsonga’s on Fed/Roger’s side of the draw, so they’ll have to deal with him first.

Could be another Djokovic / Rafa semi? Who knows. But it seems like a balanced and good draw overall.


jane Says:

That should read Fed/Roddick’s side of the draw (in referring to Tsonga).


jane Says:

Well…Murray does have Fish & Safin on the lower half of his side, but more troublesome might be that’d he could face Ancic in his first match.


Von Says:

Except for a few names switched around, this draw is very similar to IW. Again, the usual players got the easier draws. Djoko, Ferrer, Fed and Davydenko. Can someone please tell me WHY Roddick is always in Fed’s quarter. It almost seems like Fed requisitions Roddick. It’s mind boggling! I have to talk to the ATP about this, as if they’ll listen to me. :)


Maja Says:

The draw for Miami:

My prediction of half finalists (I’ll try to have unusual and brave predictions to make it more fun):

Semifinalists: Tsonga vs. Kohlschreiber
AND
Djokovic vs. Nalbandian


I like tennis bullies not tennis sissies Says:

the miami draw is exactly the same as indian wells


jane Says:

Von,

At least the soonest he could face Fed is the quarters. One way to look at it positively is that Roddick is way overdue for a W against Roger – maybe he’ll get it this time.

But you’re right, he’s usually on Fed’s half/quarter of the draw (not at the AO though). I think this is due to his seeding, as Kash explained last time. 1,2,3,4 are spread out to different quarters and then the seeds are distributed…somehow…before others are drawn. You’d have to get the full explanation from Kash.


Von Says:

jane:

I understand what you’re saying about the draws and I know that’s how the draws are done, but it’s still so wierd that he nearly always ends up on Fed’s side, regardless of his seed number. It’s just not possible that IW and now Miami he’s at the same position in the line up. Same with Blake and Isner, the same position as IW. Is this some form of bias against the Americans? Those knuckleheads need to shake ‘em up. It’s almost like they just moved a few names around from IW but left the Americans as status quo. I smell a fish, and I don’t mean Mardy. :)


jane Says:

Von,

Given that it’s an American event, and SE has Roddick on the front page of their website, I’d be shocked if there were some sort of conspiracy (fishy or otherwise). ;-) But draws are weird. Isner has faced Fed (or could’ve) a few times now in early rounds, and it seems like Andy Murray always has Verdasco and/or Davyedenko on his side.

I don’t think Djokovic’s draw is easy; he’s got Gonza, Canas, Berdych, Lopez, Querry and Gasquet all on his quarter; Rafa has Nieminen, Moya and Mathieu again, in addition to Blake, but now also Stepanek or Nalbandian.

Roddick’s first test, I think, will come against Tsonga if he gets through. Fed has to get past a few dangerous players before he could even meet Andy, so you never know.

Think positive. Andy has had a great season so far; I’d like to see him do well here, though, since we know dirt is not his surface…


Von Says:

jane:

Alright, you’ve convinced me. I’ll try to think positive and hope that Andy can do well at Miami. He shouldn’t have any problems with the court, considering he has won the MS Miami shield before. I’d like to see him repeat that. Come on Rover, move your bloomin’ arse!


Dr. Death Says:

Von – I love madness especially in March. Another tournament, another champ, I hope. Fish, Roddick, Nadal – all mad I hope.

“I am interested in madness. I believe it is the biggest thing in the human race, and the most constant. How do you take away from a man his madness without also taking away his identity?”


Daniel Says:

Although Kash gave a full explanation, in the old days, the draw tends to be 1-8, 2-7, 3-6 and 4-5 in the quarters and 1-4, 2-3 in the semis (last year all Slams were 1-4, 2-3 semis). In the women side this happens more than with man.

If you look at the Miami draw, the n°2 Nadal are facing n°7 Nalbandian, and n°4 Davydenko are facing n°5 Ferrer. If there was logic, Fed n°1 would play n°8 Gasquet and not Roddick n°6.

I sense a conspiracy here! It seems that they put Roddick on Fed’s side to lift Fed’s moral due to his record against Andy. Every important tournament that he beats Andy he is the champion. When this thought cross my mind I couldn’t help searching the ATP site to see if I was crazy, look what I got:

2007: AO, US open and Master Cup
2006: US open and Masters Cup
2005: Wimbledon and Cincinnati
2004: Bangkok, Toront and wimbledon
2003: Wimbledon and Masters Cup (Roddick won Montreal and ends this year as n°1)

I am still laughing! :)


jane Says:

Wow – maybe Daniel’s onto something Von?


Jonno Says:

Hi. Looking at the ever so slightly wider picture I still think generally you have to include Nalbandian in the very top flight mix with the top 3. He came incredibly close to putting out Fish and I actually think that was a better match For fish than even the Fed one. With less points to defend I have little doubt that an injury free Nalbandian will be one of the top three by August if not before. I think he could win both the French and Wimbledon this year. In all seriousness,particularly with his recent record against the top three. I think these FOUR players will draw clear as the year progresses.


suzq5 Says:

All I know is that most tennis players are complimentary about their opponent after a match. You know, like “He played really well” or “he was tough”…all except the over inflated ego of Djokovic. What an arrogant jerk!!!!
I hope he loses fast so I don’t have to listen to his boastful ignorance.


Shital Green Says:

Daniel,
Thanks for the math.
However, I am just gonna look into Miami draws of the past 8 years.
In 2000, Roddick was in the 1st quarter, lost to Agassi in the 1st rd.
In 2001, when Roddick etered (2nd time) Miami as a Wild Card, he was unseeded 91.

(1) That year (2001), the draw was as follows: No. 1 & 8 in the 1st qt.; 3 & 6 in the 2nd qt.; 7& 4 in the 3rd; and 5 & 2 in the 4th (Fed seeded 24th and Roddick unseeded 91, not in the same half).
(2) 2002: 1-6 in the 1st; 4-5 in the 2nd; 3-7 in the 3rd; 2-8 in the 4th(Roddick as 10th was in the 3rd; Fed as 12th in the 2nd, not in the same half).
(3) 2003: 1-5 in the 1st; 3-6 in the 2nd; 7-4 in the 3rd; and 8-2 in the 4th. (Roddick as 6th and Fed as 4th seeded, not in the same half).
(4) 2004: 1-7 in the 1st qt.; 3-6 in the 2nd qt.; 4-8 in the 3rd; 5-2 in the 4th (Roddick seeded as No. 2 wins the title; Fed as No. 1, not in the same half).
(5) 2005: 1-6 in the 1st qt.; 4-7 in the 2nd; 8-3 in the 3rd; and 5-2 in the 4th (Roddick seeded as No.2; Fed as No. 1, not in the same half).
(6) 2006: 1-8 in the 1st; 4-7 in the 2nd; 3-5 in the 3rd; and 2-6 in the 4th (Roddick seeded No. 4 and Fed No. 1, in the same half).
(7) 2007: 1-6 in the 1st qt; 4-7 in the 2nd; 5-3 in the 3rd; 2-8 in the 4th (Roddick seeded No. 3 and Fed No. 1, not in the same half).
(8) 2008: 1-6 in the 1st qt; 4-5 in the 2nd; 3-8 in the 3rd; and 2-7 in the 4th (Roddick seeded No. 6 and Fed No. 1, in the same half).

The only time Roddick and Fed were in the same half of the draw at Miami was in 2006 before this year. You guys make the judgment whether there is any conspiracy in this year’s Miami draw.

One more thing, I wonder why nobody is talking about 5-setter final at Miami (well, IW also had the same until 2001): Whom is it going to favor?

Prediction (just for fun): A couple of the big fish, including Fed/ Djoko/ Nadal, might not survive the 1st rd. There will be bigger surprises at Miami than IW.


jane Says:

suzq5,

Didn’t Djokovic praise Tsonga after beating him at the AO?

In case you forget, have a listen:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVvSWzJ3caQ

And didn’t he praise Fish after beating him this weekend?

Here, have a looksee:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrZLnkJBC9c

If you’re going to criticize (or should I say insult?) someone, at least check your facts.


jane Says:

Or maybe simply refer to the article above, isn’t this “complimentary”?

“There is something in this desert air which keeps me going year after year,” Djokovic said. “I am doing pretty good here…I also want to congratulate Mardy on a fantastic week. Obviously, his ranking is not good enough. He’s a much better player than that and deserves to be ranked much higher.”


suzq5 Says:

Oh Jane, Jane.
All these “niceties” after the remark of “I didn’t play very well, playing an unseeded player”? Bit of a back-handed compliment, don’t you think?

If you want to love him, go ahead….I will take the GENTLEMEN of tennis, who aren’t so full of themselves. Unfortunately, to watch them, I will probably have to endure THE EGO


bob22 Says:

Good work Jane, they have short memory loss.

Tennis lovers read this excellent article:
http://mvn.com/tennis/2008/02/28/you-think-tennis-has-it-bad-dept/


Von Says:

Dr. Death:

“I am interested in madness. I believe it is the biggest thing in the human race, and the most constant.”
“How do you take away from a man his madness without also taking away his identity?”

According to Mr. Spock, “Absolutely logical.” However, “Beware of the ides of March.” :)


elee Says:

Looking at the Miami draw, Roddick has a pretty easy draw, no one should give him any trouble until he possibly meets with Tsonga, which hopefully he can beat to set up another match against Roger Federer.


Shital Green Says:

suzq5,
You can follow Mathew Arnold’s “touchstone method” of high culture or Jonathan Swift’s “sweetness and light,” and you can have “the GENTLEMEN of tennis” in white suits on Perera’s croquet lawn in Birmingham, England or Leamington Spa. The Arnoldian thing of the past—prior to the Open era when tennis was exclusive to the social elites like golf is still today, to some extent, for country club upscaled people—has little place in populist culture in democratic societies that tennis has embraced. Every neighborhood park has a court in most cities in America after the Open Era (1968). It is no longer a gentleman’s sports because that was discriminatory. And we longer wear those suits and only occasionally play on “lawns” (“lawn tennis”) except to reminisce the ontogenic history of tennis.


Dr. Death Says:

show me the money (refrain)


Branimir Says:

Djokovic to win Miami too. I don’t see anyone stopping him, except himself or Nalbandian. Miami climate and the court suits him even better than IW. Last year he absolutely destroyed everyone. The only guy who can stop him is David Nalbandian (if he brings his A game).

@suzq5,

If you don’t like Djokovic, please use the facts against him, not myths. Fish was the one who didn’t mention Novak in his speech, while Novak mention Fish first like it should be done. Again I don’t dislike Fish, so I will not take that against him.

There are many things Djokovic needs to improve on, but complimenting his opponent is not one.


the H man Says:

There is something physically wrong with Roger. Any one who has watched him play over the years can see that he is missing his target on his shots by a foot or so. Also, his first serve is not there. He looked so listless in the Fish Match at Indian Wells. I think he still has the effect of Mono in his system. Isn’t it obvious. You just don’t lose it in 4 months at 27 yrs. old. There is something wrong.


NIKO Says:

Bravo Djoka?Love ya roka.We are proud of you brother.Love you Serbian spirit,harth and soul.God bless you brother for ever and ever Amin.Remember milions harths is with you and our Futher in heven.Stay brave belive in God and youll be No 1.Love you Nesa.


jane Says:

Oh suzq5, suzq5

Give me some context for this remark – “I didn’t play very well, playing an unseeded player”? Bit of a back-handed compliment, don’t you think?” – and I ‘ll respond to your query.

I don’t think it’s very gentleman-like or ladylike to insult young champions who may have a thing or two to learn. Give him a chance. Roger was a hothead when he was younger, so was Roddick. Even Andre Agassi was a renegade in many ways when he started out.

And furthermore, couldn’t we say all players complimenting their opponents are performing “niceties” then? Why the double standard?

It’s fine for you not to like Djokovic but just back up your comments. Clearly, he does compliment his opponents. Sometimes what he says can come across as arrogant, but that may be youth to a degree,

And I’m not super fond of some of his or Gonza’s loud fans, but we can’t blame that on the players.


Branimir Says:

With Djokovic is very strange. Many people substitute his honesty with arrogance. :) He is too honest in his interviews telling what his goals are, and when he wants to archive them.


I like tennis bullies not tennis sissies Says:

a day later and still thrilled Federer lost (again) :D


Von Says:

Dr. Death:

Just some food for thought to humor us both, and a prolongation on the topic of ‘madness’.

“Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.”
– Shakespeare, Hamlet

and then again,

“There is but one end for those who want to change the world: Madness!”

Thus, ends the topic of ‘madness’. :)


jane Says:

Here’s a mad prediction – just for fun because I am almost always wrong about these sorts of predictions:

Roddick vs. Murray in the top half semi-final; a guy named Andy will win. Fish is my alternate in the top half.

Djokovic vs. Rafa in the bottom half semi-final; Nalbandian is my alternate on this half.


jane Says:

Dr. Death,

“show me the money (refrain)”

I don’t get it; I mean I know the allusion but huh?


Shital Green Says:

jane,
Have you played ATP Bracket Circuit yet? I just did.
I have similar picks:

Fed might not survive Isner. If he does, I’d like to see him play Roddick/Tsonga in the quarter.
In the semi of the 1st half: Andy Murray vs. Roddick or Tsonga or Fed (in that order).

In the 2nd half, Gasquet, if he beats Del Potro, will beat Berdych. Djoko might lose to either Gonzalez or Gasquet. If Djoko survives both, he will be on the way to the title. He could be playing Rafa or Nalby in the semi of the 2nd half.

So the final: Roddick/Tsonga/Murray/Fed vs. Djoko/Gasquet/Rafa/Nalby.
(Any two will work for me in the final. A surprise like Isner vs. Del Potro would be fun to watch, too).


Skorocel Says:

“Can someone please tell me WHY Roddick is always in Fed’s quarter. It almost seems like Fed requisitions Roddick. It’s mind boggling! I have to talk to the ATP about this, as if they’ll listen to me.” :)

Don’t worry Von! If Fed plays the way he’s played against Mardy, A-Rod won’t even have a chance to meet him :)


MMT Says:

I used to really dislike Djokovic, because the first time I’d heard of him he had just lost to Nadal at RG, and claimed the loss was more down to himself than Nadal. I was very annoyed. Later, I grew to resent his parents – I just can’t stand parents who take themselves to be the center of attention, and nobody (but Yuri Shaparov, maybe) does it like the Djokovic’s. Maybe you could throw in Richard Williams, but what’s he’s done is exceptional raising two educated champions from one of the worst neighborhoods in America.

But today I’m okay with him – first of all he’s backing up whatever he says/doesn’t say with his play. And secondly, he is an interesting guy – funny and intelligent. He’s also getting pretty good at mind games.


jane Says:

Hi Shital Green,

I never bet on anything (don’t even buy scratch-and-wins); I am not really sure what the bracket circuit is all about, though I saw it at the ATP website.

Cilic is a “dark horse’.


jane Says:

MMT,

I feel sorry for players who have to deal with obnoxious parents (Yuri is the worst!!). It can reflect badly on them and then at times they’re put on the spot in press conferences (how could Maria possibly explain Yuri’s dumb gesture at the AO?). I know my own parents can be painfully embarrassing at times; imagine having to deal with it on a world stage – ugh!

Then there are the mad, football-like, overly-nationalistic fans (Gonza, Djoko and Baggy have the most zealous ones); what is a player to do? It’s great to have people cheering you on, but sheesh!

Oh well, the price of fame and fortune is but a pittance in the scheme of things.


Sanlarc Says:

I really dont see what is difficult about seeing Djocko’s past comments as arrogant.They simply were. And I think we can see in how some of the families behave in the players box hmm


Tote Tennis Pro Says:

It’s going to be very interesting in the mens game to see who is going to take Federers crown off him. Djok has certainly enmerged as a credible challenger alongside Nadal, and he alluded to a big 3 in his post tournament press conference.

I personally think that the three of them will now take it in turns winning major tournaments (Nadal obviously with the French) and we will see no clear number 1. And i think the game will be better off for not having one man completely dominate. I look forward to seeing some epic battles in the near future…


Maja Says:

suzq5 Says:

All I know is that most tennis players are complimentary about their opponent after a match. You know, like “He played really well” or “he was tough”…all except the over inflated ego of Djokovic. What an arrogant jerk!!!!
I hope he loses fast so I don’t have to listen to his boastful ignorance.

WHY DO YOU LIE? HE ALWAYS SAYS THAT SAME THING AND ALWAYS HAVE A RESPECT OF HIS OPONNENTS. WHY DO YOU HATE HIM SO MUCH THAT YOU HAVE TO MAKE UP THINGS?


Shital Green Says:

Guys,
It’s free to try ATP Bracket Challenge Circuit. Lock in your pick by 26th, 9 am ET, and win a VIP trip to any ATP tournament worldwide. It is similar to what they had at the last year’s US Open. You pick a winner in each round, from 1st through final. Then at the end you have to guess the number of games played in the final. The highest scorer wins.
Good luck !


andrea Says:

all the players have their own subtle way of bitch slappin other players without it being discernible.

roger saying about novak at the us open ‘it’s a shame he had to lose in straight sets’ (not verbatim) and novak saying the same thing about roger at the AO. all very subtle but getting their points across.

the parents of players however have yet to develop this tactic – read: mr. williams and mrs. djokovic.


Maja Says:

Shital Green – it is important to say that the contest is limited just on certain countries… for example I can not participate, everyone should read rules first –> http://challenge.atptennis.com/atp/rules.php?X=1206485918


Shital Green Says:

maja,
Thanks for the link. It clarifies a lot of things I was unaware and unable to articulate.


Dr. Death Says:

Jane – “money” comment – just a general reference as to why people are in the sport (or any other). Indeed it is not the white shoe crowd who played for honour and sport.

The financial side of the game takes it to a different level – winning becomes important for the endorsements, etc.

Von – End of Madness. Pick another theme when you like.


Von Says:

Skorocel:

“Don’t worry Von! If Fed plays the way he’s played against Mardy, A-Rod won’t even have a chance to meet him.”

Knowing how Fed loves to humiliate Andy, he’ll probably will himself to be in the very best of form to stay healthy if, and when, he meets Andy. :) I just want my little cub to win. Surely, that’s not asking too much. :)


jane Says:

Dr. Death,

Gotcha.


jane Says:

I mean, I get it. Money talks and all that.

Top story: Serena Williams, Halep Win at WTA Finals; Tues. Schedule
  • Recent Comments
Rankings
ATP - Oct 20 WTA - Oct 20
1 Novak Djokovic1 Serena Williams
2 Roger Federer2 Maria Sharapova
3 Rafael Nadal3 Simona Halep
4 Stan Wawrinka4 Petra Kvitova
5 David Ferrer5 Na Li
6 Tomas Berdych6 Agnieszka Radwanska
7 Kei Nishikori7 Eugenie Bouchard
8 Marin Cilic8 Ana Ivanovic
9 Milos Raonic9 Caroline Wozniacki
10 Andy Murray10 Angelique Kerber
More: Tennis T-Shirts | Tennis Shop | Live Tennis Scores | Headlines

Copyright © 2003-2014 Tennis-X.com. All rights reserved.
This website is an independently operated source of news and information and is not affiliated with any professional organizations.