Sharapova the Cow Advances; Davydenko Out at French Open
by Staff | June 1st, 2008
  • 74 Comments

Top 10 Seeds Davydenko, Wawrinka Fall at French Open

It was five-set Saturday at the French Open, where half of the eight matches went the distance, resulting in the upsets of No. 4 Nikolay Davydenko and No. 9 Stan Wawrinka.


No. 28 seed Ivan Ljubicic came from two sets down to stun Davydenko, while No. 24 Fernando “Gonzo” Gonzlaez likewise came from two sets down to subdue Wawrinka.

Davydenko admitted to choking away his lead.

“First two sets he didn’t play,” the fourth-seeded Davydenko said. “Then he start to fighting a little bit more…That’s why I was starting to be nervous, start to make so many mistakes.”

Other winners into the fourth round Saturday were (1) Roger Federer (d. Mario Ancic), (5) David Ferrer (d. (25) Lleyton Hewitt in five), (21) Radek Stepanek (d. (12) Tommy Robredo), Frenchmen Gael “Force” Monfils (d. Jurgen Melzer in five) and Julien “United Colors of” Benneteau (d. Robin Soderling), and American Robby Ginepri (d. Florent Serra).

“The more I play on the clay, I think, the better my all-around game is going to get, and the smarter I am going to get on the court,” Ginepri said.

Highlights Sunday at Roland Garros are (3) Novak Djokovic vs. (18) Paul-Henri Mathieu, (2) Rafael Nadal vs. (22) Fernando Verdasco, Ernests Gulbis vs. Michael Llodra, and France’s Jeremy Chardy vs. (19) Nicolas Almagro.

Sharapova the Cow, Kuznetsova Advance at French Open

World No. 1 Maria Sharapova, the self-described “cow on ice,” the favorite at the French Open? Not exactly, but the lanky Russian saw a ray of hope on Saturday as she advanced into the fourth round at the French Open in straight sets.

“I kind of forgot what it felt like to finish in two [sets],” Sharapova said after defeating No. 32 seed Karin Knapp in straight sets. “I’ve been kind of lucky to get through those two matches. Today was definitely a step-up from the previous two.”

One player to watch out for is No. 4 seed and former US Open champ Svetlana Kuznetsova, who is feeling it.

“When I play well, I have such pleasure when I’m playing,” Kuznetsova told reporters. “It’s really great to be doing something which you love to do. It’s hard work. Definitely nothing is easy, but it’s a huge pleasure to live life like that.”

Orchestrating upsets on the day were Czech Petra Kvitova (d. (12) Agnes Szavay in three), and Estonia’s Kaia Kanepi (d. (29) Anabel Medina Garrigues in three).

Other winners Saturday were (3) Jelena Jankovic (d. (28) Dominika Cibulkova), (7) Elena Dementieva (d. Olga Govortsova), (11) Vera Zvonareva (d. Aleksandra Wozniak), (13) Dinara Safina (d. Jie Zheng), and (16) Victoria Azarenka (d. (18) Francesca Schiavone).

Scheduled for Sunday at Roland Garros are (2) Ana Ivanovic vs. Petra Cetkovska, (14) Agnieszka Radwanska vs. (3) Jelena Jankovic, (26) Flavia Pennetta vs. Carla Suarez Navarro, and (27) Katarina Srebotnik vs. (10) Patty Schnyder.


Also Check Out:
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Former French Open Winners Gaudio, Ferrero in Mix at Estoril
Favorites Nadal, Henin Head French Quarters
Kim Clijsters, Nikolay Davydenko Withdraw from French Open
Tsonga Hammers Federer, Advances To First French Open Semifinal

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74 Comments for Sharapova the Cow Advances; Davydenko Out at French Open

Glenn Says:

Wawrinka lost but it was a great match with a lot of really great shotmaking. Gonzalez is also one of my favorites, so I’m glad it was a good match through and through.

It feels good to watch a match without the baby antics of a Djokovic or a Roddick.


jane Says:

Djokovic advanced today in a well contested match with Mathieu, who has talent, but as the commentators opined, needs tactical smarts to push him just that little further. He could also use something of a net game.

Djokovic, in case you weren’t watching Glenn, was an excellent sport on the court, giving Mathieu the thumbs up when he hit an excellent shot, showing concern when Mathieu had a tumble at the net, and smiling when the French crowd were rallying around Mathieu in the 3 set. Nonetheless he stayed focused on his task and finished it.

Personally I think he’ll have a tougher time with Gulbis, another player I enjoy. Djokovic will have to take care of his service games against Gulbis. This guy has nothing to lose and everything to gain, which is in many ways the most dangerous opponent.

If there is to be an upset of 1,2 and 3 all reaching the semis, I’d predict it’ll be either Gulbis upsetting Djoko or – and maybe this is audacious – Stepanek upsetting Roger.

No one will upset Rafa; at least I can’t see it.


jane Says:

From the ATP site: “The 80th-ranked Gulbis joins Novak Djokovic (2006), Rafael Nadal (2005) and Roger Federer (2001) as the only teenagers in the last 10 years to reach the quarterfinals (or better) at Roland Garros.”

Says a little something about Gulbis’ potential!


Shital Green Says:

Although it was a straight set win for Djoko, it was a very close and hard-fought match if we look at game by game. Mathieu’s serve, as always, was consistently big on the far side. Some of his cross court shots from the mid court were really impressive. At times unable to predict Mathieu’s wide angled serves, Djoko showed some vulnerability of his forehand when he had to stretch to get to them. Needless to say, he played great at critical moments. I am glad he is through to the quarter. But Gulbis is another big server to take seriously, even though Djoko has the ability to outplay him from the baseline. I also watched Llodra-Gulbis match this morning. It had a lot of serve and volley exchanges, a rarity these days, kind of reminded me of Sampras days when quite a few used to play like that.
Back to Nadal-Verdasco match, battle of the two lefties. It should be still a straight set win for Nadal. Good luck for him.


joe Says:

Just saw that Patty Schynder beat Srebotnik to make it into the quarters. Well done to her, always happy to see her do well. That result should edge her back into the top 10 in the rankings(From what i can make of it anyway)

I predict Djokovic will wear down, but still lose to, Nadal in the Semis, and Roger will beat Nadal and take the title.


Shital Green Says:

Hi Jane,
After reading your assessment of Gulbis, whom you seem to have followed more closely than I have, I may have to back off a bit and look forward to a competitive match, which Djoko would like to finish as early as he can. My only hope is that, if he’s well rested, he can give me a good semi, at least as good as the Hamburg semi.

Anyway, I predict Djoko will not face an upset, even if it does not feel bad to lose to you. I’d rather take the “audacious” one.

And, btw, I had already read the Clown Prince article. It was largely balanced, appreciation mixed with almost imperceptible, mild sarcasm.

(Off the topic, when I was working on Reflexivity and Focalization in films one time, I happened to talk to Edward Branigan and Robert Stam).


jane Says:

Shital,

Cool – I love Stam’s writings on Adaptations; I did a lot of my graduate work on film adaptations of literature. Do you teach philosophy?

Listen, don’t get me wrong, of course I want Novak to win! But since Gulbis pushed his way into the 4th round at the USO last year, I just thought, “this guy is something.”

Don’t know if you’ve read Novak’s presser from today, but he and Ernests go way back apparently having experienced some “crazy” times off court, and apparently Ernests having kicked his butt on the practice court. But as Novak pointed out, practice sessions are different than official matches. I expect Novak will be pushed in his quarter anyhow. But I’d like for him to equal, or even better, last year’s results here.


jane Says:

Much as I like Rafa, and remain in awe of his clay prowess, it’s no fun to see Verdasco pummeled like this.


Shital Green Says:

Jane,
So Gulbis and Djoko are buddies? Even though practice court sessions are different, they indicate something. I am more scared now. As Djoko knows what he will be facing on the match court, I hope he won’t be beaten, at least not at his surprise. If Djoko beats Gulbis, it would, then, be a counter surprise for Gulbis, then? I just cannot wait to see this match.

[To find out what I teach/do, you could either google me up or visit my website: http://sadahal.pageout.net
This is a website hosted by McGraw Hill. If you want to have one (it is free for life), I will send you an invitation. That's the only way you can get it. You can directly email me from my site.
I did not do much film studies. Two years ago, I wrote about Karel Reisz and Harold Pinter’s adaptation of John Fowles' The French Lieutenant’s Woman.]


andrea Says:

re: novak and andy

baby antics…drama queens…over the top…you name it, those two are my least favorite to watch.


jane Says:

PJ – wherever you are – I believe it was you who was speculating as to the odds of playing as many lefties Nadal as has in the first four rounds. Well, I read this today:

“Oddly enough, Nadal’s opponents so far this year all were left-handed, the first time a man has faced four consecutive southpaws at a Grand Slam tournament in the 40-year Open Era.”


PJ Says:

Thanks, Jane. I think that stat is even more astounding because Nadal himself is a left-hander. I didn’t get to see the match, but Nadal is freaking unbelievable. My heart is still rooting for Federer, but I just can’t see anyone stopping Nadal.

I’m thrilled Patty Schnyder is back in the quarterfinals. She played well today. I don’t see her beating Ana, but I hope she does.


jane Says:

Shital, thanks for the link; it didn’t work so I googled you and you look exactly like I thought you would (okay, not really). I admire you; you so bravely put yourself out there. I am less accessible, generally going incognito on the net. But I am totally available to students in person & via email. I guess I am ‘old school’ that way.

So we’re two post-secondary, English Department instructors, somewhat anti-establishment, Novak Djokovic fans. No wonder we hit it off.

Here’s to more good tennis, and back to my prep – sigh.


Shital Green Says:

Jane,
Let me try in my elementary French.
Je ne suis pas d’enseigner la philosophie. J’enseigne la littérature. Je suis encore un doctorat étudiant, à proximité de terminer ma thèse. Ma thèse traite de la théorie des systèmes, Phénoménologie, Discours Theory, Cybernetics, Post-humanisme, post-coloniaux littérature.
Correction à mon adresse: http://sdahal.pageout.net


jane Says:

PJ,

“Nadal is freaking unbelievable.” Indeed.


mjölk Says:

“Gonzalez is also one of my favorites, so I’m glad it was a good match through and through.

It feels good to watch a match without the baby antics of a Djokovic or a Roddick.”

Yeah, I know what you mean. The way Gonzalez smashes his rackets and screams at everyone is way cooler than anything Djokovic and Andy do.


Von Says:

This thread is NOT about Roddick — he’s not playing in the FO, or have you guys not been reading? However, there are those in the OCD group who belabor Roddick’s behavior, (which is a lot more mature than some of the greats, the real cry babies and drama queens)and seize upon anything to lambaste the guy. People, put a sock on it, stow it, or become fixated on something or someone else in the FO, or try cleaning windows — that should give the body and the mind some much needed workout — I sense some rust piling up. In simple language, stifle.

Even though I’m not a Djokovic fan, from what I’ve seen recently, he’s trying to be more mature and has kept most of his emotions in check. What do you want on the courts, spiritless wimps?


Von Says:

So good to see Patty Schnyder advance to the QFs. She’s a very smart player — not a ball basher. Hopefully, if and/or when she does play Sharapova she can repay her for that stunt the shrieka pulled againt her at last year’s FO.
___________

jane:

“Listen, don’t get me wrong, of course I want Novak to win! But since Gulbis pushed his way into the 4th round at the USO last year, I just thought, “this guy is something.” ”

Are my eyes deceiving me? It’s great to be generous towards Gulbis, but I think you’re just hoping against hope that Novak will win. :) Irregardless of who’s the victor, it will be a great match. Hopefully Djoko will be in top form and rearing to go — sticking his chest out. :) Whenever i look at him, his posture/deportment reminds me of my finishing school days, walking with a pile of books on my head, while being told, shoulders back, chest forward — not something a teenage girl would relish. John McEnroe stated that Monfils should practice sticking his chest out like Djoko.


jane Says:

Von,

Honestly, I do like Gulbis! But of course I want Novak to equal his results from last year. You’ve found me out.

“John McEnroe stated that Monfils should practice sticking his chest out like Djoko.” It wouldn’t hurt would it? I wish my coverage had John commentating; for the finals it’ll switch to CBS and finally I’ll get to listen to Johnny Mac, one of my favorite things about tennis.

Thanks for pointing out the obvious re: the complaints. I get tired of hearing the same ones over and over. Sigh. Oh well, folks are entitled to vent, and at least, as you astutely point out Djoko is IN the FO; Roddick meanwhile is not playing and yet he sits in people’s minds. Consider it a symbol of his power. :-)


jane Says:

Actually, back in the day, Mac was the King of the caved in chest; who’s he to talk? LOL! Love that guy.


Von Says:

jane:

“Roddick meanwhile is not playing and yet he sits in people’s minds. Consider it a symbol of his power.”

His power is pure mind torture for many. Maybe if Roddick can adopt Davydenko’s court demeanour, that will please the OCD group — I strongly doubt it though. Then he’ll be criticized for being anorexic, gaunt, boring and lifeless. It would be understandable if he was playing, but considering he’s not, and has not done or said anything that’s deserving of criticism, speaks volumes about his critics’ remarks. They’re just groping around in the dark for something to say. Even his one (1) minute commercial is an outrage and/or abomination. I’ll say something now to rile them up — he looks better than Fed in his (K)ontrol and Gilette commercials.

“I wish my coverage had John commentating; for the finals it’ll switch to CBS and finally I’ll get to listen to Johnny Mac, one of my favorite things about tennis.”

To be truthful, up until ’06, I disliked Johnny Mac’s commentary, especially, when he and Carillo were on together. They were unmerciful towards the Americans; I used to put my TV on mute when I saw them together. However, Johnny Mac’s been kinder and more mellow in his comments, specifically towards Roddick, and I now enjoy listening to JMac. He was genuinely happy that the Americans won Davis Cup, and made it past the first round in the FO this year.

“Actually, back in the day, Mac was the King of the caved in chest; who’s he to talk? LOL! Love that guy.”

His caved in chest demeanor fooled many of his opponents. They never knew whether he was up or down in his thinking; usually slumped shoulders are an indicator of when things are not going well, but in his case it was always a mystery. It was kind of coincidental that he mentioned Sampras’ drooped shoulders too when speaking about Monfils; remarking that despite Pete’s deportment he won 14 slams. One can never guage attitude according to rule of thumb guidelines on behavior.

BTW, aside from the Tennis Channel, which network carried the Sunday FO coverage? It was supposed to be NBC in my area, but NBC had the St. Jude’s Children telethon. I saw 3 women’s matches, some of Gulbis’ match on the Tennis Channel, and nothing else. I’m so disappointed. I was up early for that. Whom should I strangle?


PJ Says:

Jane, I agree that Stepanek could take out Fed (so I hope Ferrer takes Radek out tomorrow). I think Radek is the biggest threat to Fed making the finals.

Joe, I would love to see Djokovic tire Nadal out and then have Fed beat Nadal in the finals. However, that tactic didn’t help Roger in Hamburg, and I don’t know if it’ll happen now. Nadal is not looking vulnerable at all.


PJ Says:

I forgot to add this to my last post. At first, when I was watching the Schnyder/Srebotnik match, I was annoyed by the commentators. But, I began to really enjoy the commentary, especially from Corina Morariu. It was nice hearing about doubles, playing with Patty, etc. Having a recently retired player helps lend insight into some of the players, especially ones we may not see very often (or those that may be better known for doubles).


jane Says:

Von:

“One can never guage attitude according to rule of thumb guidelines on behavior.”

So true; who would’ve thunk Johnny Mac was as athletic as he was? Or that Davydenko is a tennis-playing machine.

“aside from the Tennis Channel, which network carried the Sunday FO coverage? ”

In Canada TSN seems to be picking up coverage from either Britain or Australia judging by the main commentator’s accent; he’s joined by a French commentator who speaks broken English. Doesn’t seem to be ESPN, so I am not sure what feed we’re getting? We got the full Djoko match, a bit of Gulbis’ match, a bit of Almagro’s match, and Rafa’s until the rain delay; then they cut it off. They showed zip of the women’s matches.


TD (Tam) Says:

Von:
“What do you want on the courts, spiritless wimps?”

Bravo, Von. Your wisdom knows no limits.

Why are people even mentioning Roddick anyway? He’s not in Paris. I guess they miss him terribly. Roddick is not so easily forgotten. :p

I agree with your comments about Dokovic too he seems to have adjusted his behavior after the hailstorm of criticism he has received about his behavior. I enjoyed his match with Mathieu today although I was rooting for Mathieu. Novak was smart to keep on the down low and not try to rile the crowd up.

jane, that is a very interesting stat about left handers. Nadal has tore through his opposition losing very few games. He really is a sight to behold (and fear) on the clay.


Von Says:

Glenn:

“Wawrinka lost but it was a great match with a lot of really great shotmaking. Gonzalez is also one of my favorites, so I’m glad it was a good match through and through.”

It would be logical and also make some semblance of sense to me if you liked Wawrinka for his passive/boring on court demeanor, and disliked Roddick and Djokovic for what you perceive to be their “baby antics”. Then it could be argued that you have a penchant for the less spirited or absolutely robot like personalities, and are a stickler for proper decorum, and that’s fine — to each his own. However, your liking for Gonzalez thows a different complexion on your remarks and thinking, ergo, my conclusion that you’re off the wall in your thought processes, and a selective extremist regarding your likes and/or dislikes. Or maybe there really isn’t a propensity toward proper on-court decorum as is so vehemently propounded by you, instead you just relish in being plaguy in your statements.

I like Gonzalez and enjoy his game, but he and Wawrinka are akin to the North and South poles in their on-court behavior. Gonzalez’ on-court demeanor is rife with ‘baby antics’ and his speech is fraught with obscenities, in Spanish, but despite his blatant flaws, you overlook them and absolutely like him? These selective/extremist statements demonstates that your liking for Gonzalez versus your obsessive dislike for Roddick and Djokovic is NOT at all connected to your appreciation for decent behavior from ALL players, but rather an emotion stemming predominantly from an intense persona dislike for Andy and Novak. These two young men are just persona non grata figures to you and will never do or say anything that’s remotely decent in your opinion. You have stripped them of every vestige of professionalism as athletes, and/or as human beings.

Originally, I shrugged away your comments regarding Roddick as your attempts to be facetious in your posts to me — sort of rile me up in a jovial manner. However, after reading several of your posts, especially your first comment on this thread, wherein you mentioned both A-Rod and Djoko, adding them kind of like a dangling participle, totally disconnected from the thread’s theme, I can only deduce that you are dead serious, and your dislike for Roddick/Djokovic goes very deep. You have openly stated you want for them not to just lose but to be crushed. So sorry that comeuppance has raised it’s ugly head and Wawrinka was the recipeint. Be careful what you wish for — it can come back to bite. Your intense emotions, and what I perceive to be borderline hate, is disturbing to me, since hate is a very potent/destructive emotion, and one I refuse to allow to take root and/or blossom in my thoughts. Anyway, I have a choice, and my choice will be to desist from engaging in any light banter with you henceforth concerning Roddick, because you know what Glenn, I absolutely love Andy Roddick — he has appeal, charisma, class and a big heart. Andy honey, don’t change a thing to please anyone — be yourself; I wouldn’t like you any other way!


Joker Says:

PJ:

If you saw the way Federer played against Ancic, you can make a safe bet that if Federer stays in that mood, rafa will have to bring his very best to 4-peat. Given the year Federer has so far, the “If” about federer keeping up that form becomes very very big. That is the same “if” that makes stepanek a threat to Federer. (Though I personally believe ferrer is the most dangerous of threats in federer’s way to the final)

Federer does not need any help from djokovic in his quest. The last 2 FO finals were closer than the scores indicate. Federer had 10 breakpoint chances in the 1st set and he won the 2nd set. In 06, Nadal choked while serving for the match and pulled the 4th set in a tie-breaker. Nadal was definitely tired by no one for those 2 finals.

The moment of truth for Federer will be if and when he walks out for that final match against nadal next sunday (At this point is more than a 50% chance that it will be a federer-nadal final). He will need to bring out the kind of game he played early in the 1st set of hamburg 08, or 2nd set of Monte-carlo 08 or the 1st set in FO 2006. That kind of game early-on when nadal tends to be unsure and uncertain (look at the 1st 2 rounds this week) will give Federer a lot of chances. While Nadal has a good say in those chances, Federer will have to make sure he does what he can and not back away like he did in the above mentioned matches.

The last match against ancic, federer played it with the ferocity with which he played the Masters cup. That FH was looking like the slingshot it was when it used to crush the likes of roddick, hewitt, agassi and safin into pulp. The serve was in the zone like it was in the wimbledon and US final and the master’s cup last year. The bh was flowing like it does when fed reminds us that it is one of the most under-rated single handed backhands in history. Most importantly, federer was full of energy. I have never seen him so charged up. That is exactly the kind of energy he will need to beat Rafa on clay. We will know tomorrow if that was just a one off thing or something the Fed camp is working on.

Fed needs to get down and dirty on the red clay to take nadal out. His pristine game which makes everyone purr on the green lawns of Wimbledon will not cut it against rafa on clay. Fed needs to play a warrior’s game like he did at Wimbledon last year.


Tejuz.. Says:

Well.. Stepanek took out Fed in 2 tie breakers last time.. this time Fed will be more than ready for Stepanek if both face each other in the semis.
But yes.. it will be tough for Fed if its Stepanek or Ferrer. But Fed would like them anytime rather than facing the wicked left handed top-spin to his backhand.

Djoker.. no matter what he does or claims.. he always appear fake to me.. especially in his interviews. When he says, Gulbis thrashed him regularly at practice, he was just trying to lessen the expectations for everybody for this QF match. He does appear to have mellowed down a bit .. but lets see when he faces off Nadal or Fed.

Gulbis.. i have likes what i have seen of him.. he might trouble Djoker and he appears very confident. So i dont rule out an upset here… and am pretty sure He will be in top-5 very soon. Great Shotmaking.

Almagro.. dont see him beating Nadal because menatally he has already conceded this match going by his post-match interview.


Von Says:

TD:

“Bravo, Von. Your wisdom knows no limits.”

I won’t call it wisdom, but maybe stupidity — putting myself out there to be tarred and feathered. Thanks, I know your heart’s in the right place. :) BTW, you were supposed to protect me; I thought we had a pact, but the last episode of retaliation nearly cost me my feathers. I was partially plucked and somewhat singed, and TD was nowhere to be found. Shame on you for letting me down. :)

_____________

jane:

thanks for the televised matches information. I forgot to mention this, they showed the Bryans’ match v. Sam/John Isner. I was rooting for the Bryans in that one and they won. I just dislike it when the Americans have to play against each other so early in any tournament; it hinders one of them from progressing further. In this case, I had to pick the Bryans, since logic dictates that they can progress further in the tournament as opposed to Sam and John. Additionally, the Bryans have a lot of points to defend, and I don’t want our No. 1 team losing ground in the race. How very conniving a mind I have and so shamelss too, oh my. :) Anyway, Sam/joh got some good doubles experience and some extra money to boot, so all’s well that ends well.

I was glad to see Davydenko lose and now I’m hoping Ferrer will do so too. I know this sounds so terrible, but because A-Rod could not play in the FO to gain the much needed points, and both Ferrer and Davydenko are ahead of him in the race, if they both lose, then guess what, A-Rod can catch up and pass them at perhaps Wimby? My awful side is really showing through here, but all’s fair in love and war. :)

My gut feeling tells me Djoko will beat Gulbis; but he’ll be all tuckered out after that match — that being the case I don’t hold out too much hope for him moving past the semis. However, nothing is etched in stone, and one never knows, does one. Chin up, chest out Novak, you’ve got to show them that you’re not a poor faint/hearted huckleberry! :)


magellan Says:

Fed needs to get down and dirty on the red clay to take nadal out

Federina can’t be making those ballet moves against Nadal. Nadal is going to crush him.


craig Says:

Even though he says clay is not his favorite surface, I think his game is perfectly suited to it. I think he can win the tournament.

- Paul-Henri Mathieu on Novak Djokovic’s chances at the French Open


Von Says:

magllan:

“Federina can’t be making those ballet moves against Nadal. Nadal is going to crush him.”

No Swan Lake or Tiny Tim’s tiptoeing through the tulips, for sure. A duck can never be a swan though, regardless of how many times you pull its neck. :)


Glenn Says:

“Consider it a symbol of his power.”

Nah. More like a gauge of how OFTEN Roddick acts like a baby on court. :) To be honest, I just finished transferring some recorded tennis matches from my DVR to DVD, and one of them just happened to be a Roddick match wherein he started whining to the umpire and even called him names. I transferred so many matches, I forget which match it was, but it was an ’08 match. If people automatically think of Roddick when they think of childish, unsportsmanlike behavior, well, only Roddick is to blame for that and no one else.

Once I see Djokovic be sportsmanlike ON COURT to one of his MAJOR rivals, then I’ll agree that he’s trying to change. His good behavior towards players who he knows he can beat is not a good gauge of his “maturity” AT ALL. Though I must say I would enjoy watching him in such “lesser” matches where he is not so haughty, because he is a good athlete (if lacking in sportsmanship).

Does it make them boring when players are not acting like jerks or babies? Apparently, some think so. Wierd. Can’t understand it.


Joker Says:

Magellan:

Let us not forget who was the girl that choked on a banana two summers ago. Or the girl that cries about her knees and fatigue every time she gets crushed on a hard court by shotmakers like gonzalez, tsonga and djokovic.

How about the sandwich that uncle toni had to smuggle today to make the sick girl who was whining to the trainers about she being afraid of ” a pain that is going to come”?

See, it is easy to be mean. You need to realise everyone has a key-board. They can pay you back in kind and maybe, some of them will be even generous like me and give you more examples of your hiding-behind-uncle-toni-girl.

Von and TD:

Strange that Fed-haters like you are preaching to other people. What goes around comes around. High time the brat boy got his due.

Glenn dear:

Please be good and donot include Novak with that egg-headed brat boy please. By the time Novak will be finished with his career, andy roddick would be a midget in terms of achievements. Novak is in the league of federer and laver. Comfortable on all surfaces and all parts of the court. Novak moves like a gazelle on the court….. frat boy is like a donkey on ice. I hope you see the point.


Glenn Says:

Joker,

In terms of athleticism, OF COURSE Novak has Roddick beat hands down. But in terms of sportsmanship, I think he has a little growing up to do. He’s still young, so perhaps he’ll grow into his role as a champion.


hiding behind our keyboards Says:

I’d have a beer with Roddick. We could have kitchen-sink conversation, if that means anything. He’s comes across as one of the more likeable guys on the tour. His on-court abrasiveness is always for himself, to help fire him up. It’s a wonder some don’t realize this, since there are many players who yell out during matches or talk to themselves between points, or even argue with the umpire. Even role model Agassi has done nastier things on a court than Roddick (repeated verbal assaults on a lineswoman, drawing a penalty. see: 2000 AO semi vs. Sampras).
He’s not a favorite, but I always look forward to his Queen’s Club (4 titles) and Wimbledon battles, as I still consider him a fine grass-court player even though he’s struggled in recent years at the AELTC.

Is it just me, or does PHMathieu kinda sorta maybe resemble actor Michael Biehn? Weird question, I know.


Joker Says:

/*I won’t call it wisdom, but maybe stupidity */

One of the very rare instances of you being right. I am sure a lot of people will agree with you on this one.


Glenn Says:

Tejuz,

I see you have the same perception of Novak that I do – his true character comes out when he is playing against his MAIN rivals, not against someone he knows he can beat. If he is changing, we need to gauge his change by his actions in the big matches against his main rivals.


jane Says:

It’s easy to look for the holes instead of the cheese when we dislike a player; the trick is to find the cheese even in those we dislike, for whatever (almost invariably subjectively tainted) reason.

But by all means, don’t choke.


Joker Says:

Glenn:

Agree with you on Novak being young. I am sure he will mature into a great winner like Federer. He is only 20, right? He has 6 more years to be the champion Federer is. Since the aus open, you can see he is learning with the ways of the world. Federer and Novak started on the wrong note. As persons, they are very different, but their games have some common strands. Their all-court games and defense to offense switch is quite unique. Add efficient returning and ability turn the serve on under pressure. Pure joy to watch such offensive-minded players. They make even dragging clay court matches seem fun.


Joker Says:

Hiding:

Isolated incidents is one thing, Roddick is an oft-repeating culprit when it comes to trash talking a lower ranked opponents or the umpire. When he plays Federer, djokovic, nadal, hewitt or safin – players who he knows are capable of wiping the court with his behind, he behaves like he should. Against players like nishikori or mahut or other lesser ranked players, he will throw his bratty tantrums around. I find it hard to believe such stupid frat-boy behavior is not pre-meditated.


hiding behind our keyboards Says:

Joker:

I understand your feeling on this and generally agree, but it’s only pre-meditated in that it was something Connors encouraged him to do as his former coach, to play with some fire in the belly, which he really didn’t do before then, for the purpose of confidence boosting. Nadal-style fist-pumping is preferable, but it’s getting harder to be original in that department. I agree with you when it comes to the Nishikori incident in San Jose, and I’m sure in hindsight even Roddick can acknowledge having gone overboard in that match. I would not crucify Roddick any more than I would John McEnroe, who was a great tennis player known for contemptuous behavior on the court. It isn’t personal, and I don’t think it’s ever been. It’s just a derivative psychological strategy. Blessed is he who ignores his opponent’s foolish outbursts.


grendel Says:

FoT: I’m responding to you post on other thread here, since it seems to have more relevance. The fact is: you’re too nice! Of course people are inconsistent, sometimes comically so, in their little hate tirades directed at Federer – but that’s the name of the game generally, and I can’t say that I am innocent. Logically, one discerns a fault, and summons reasons to bring the fault to light. A scientist genuinely interested in probing for the truth might do this. In practice, minds are already made up on pretty primitive emotional grounds, and reasons (carefully selected) are adduced for purpose of wielding the knife. That’s how it goes. No wonder humanity is in trouble. But not because of good people like you, FoT.

Meanwhile, first two sets of Ginepri/Gonzales classy and entertaining. I like Ginepri, and on top of his other attributes, he’s sporting, too. But Gonzales came into his formidable own in 3rd set, and hopefully will provide first proper competition for Federer – (see, I’m already dismissing chances of Benneteau, a real fighter by the way: hope I don’t end up with the old egg on the face).

One comment on Nadal. Federer, it has been noted, is much improved on clay – no doubt about it. Unfortunately, so is Nadal. If only they could resuscitate the Nadal of last year – reckon Fed could handle that. But Nadal now – on clay – is something beyond awesome. I think even Borg….


grendel Says:

I’m watching the Fed match – which is obviously over by now – on tape.It’s 3-1, and Benneteau is at the moment overawed. The reason for posting is this: I’ve mentioned a couple of times – and noone has seen fit to pick it up, perhaps my point is too commonplace to warrant attention – that Federer’s drive volleys tend to be mediocre or bad. And now he has just driven a fairly simple one into the net. I wonder if he lacks confidence in it, and almost expects to fail. To my mind, this is a significant, if minor, deficiency.


hiding behind our keyboards Says:

Federer’s forehand has continued looking weak. His shot placement has not been causing enough difficulty for Benneteau thus far. Fed’s been allowing him too many opportunities to get him off balance. The down-the-line shots are going to be very important from now on, should Fed make it to the final, which is very likely – he must. He’ll have to execute those shots frequently. Volleys and dropshots galore, too. I miss the Fed of old who’d produce fanastic angles on all surfaces to great success, even against Nadal on occasion. It’s only getting tougher and Fed has been looking slow and delicate today. Maybe it’s the rain.


hiding behind our keyboards Says:

by fanastic I mean fanTastic, of course.


jane Says:

I thought Fed looked formidable against Ancic, but today TSN is showing Sharapova, so I can only follow Roger’s match via scores. Judging solely by stats it looks like his serve may be off today? Only 52% of 1st serves in and 3 double faults seems unusual for him, but as hiding mentioned, maybe it’s the rain.


jane Says:

Well, Sharapova deserved to lose today; she blew her lead in the second set and Safina was all over her.

I see Monfils is up a break – good stuff.


grendel Says:

They say you’re allowed one poor match on the way to winning a slam, but I don’t know. Could only watch first two sets for same reason as Jane, but every time Fed broke, he got broken back – and the same pattern seemed to be the case in the third set. Bearing in mind that Benneteau, whilst a fighter as I said earlier, has no big weapons – and not no big weapons a la Djokovic/Lendl no big weapons either, really and truly no big weapons – this was not the performance of a man tipped to get to the final. Never mind beat the greatest claycourter of all time. Fed looking vulnerable, no doubt.

Meanwhile, just watched the match of the tournament, between Safina and Sharapova. Astonishing tennis by both players, and great fortitude. I can’t count the number of times I had to change my mind about who looked the likely winner. The crunch seemed to come at 5-3 in 2nd set tiebreak, when an unlucky netcord deprived Sharapova of matchpoint. Too much is made of luck – in terms of draws, inclement weather, injuries,and so on. Chance lies at the very heart of existence. You’re lucky to be born, that sperm X rather than Y made it in the race to the egg; you’re lucky that having been born, you weren’t born in a prison camp, you weren’t born with a huge nose, you weren’t born with a propensity to obesity, and so on. You might say that how people deal with undeserved misfortune gives you some measure of that person. I wouldn’t say Sharapova fell short exactly; she went for an immense second serve, and because it only missed by millimetres, you could say – again – luck did not favour her. But she was beaten then.

Safina had been close to tears earlier. Now Sharapova looked on the edge of losing it maybe for the first time in her career. When being thrashed by Serena Williams, she looked resigned – one of those things and Serena, after all… But being outplayed and outfought by another Russian, this was painful, and we saw a side to Sharapova not seen before, I suspect.

Meanwhile, Safina to win the French?


I like tennis bullies not tennis sissies Says:

“Federina can’t be making those ballet moves against Nadal. Nadal is going to crush him.”
———–

Ferderina ha! ha! Princess Rojah is a sissy on the clay. :D


jane Says:

Well Woody Allen’s /Match Point/ is about precisely that element of chance: on which side of the court will the ball fall? (The net favored Monfils in his last match; he got a number of lucky bounces.)

Still, there *was* a third set in which Sharapova could’ve won, but she didn’t play as well as Safina when it mattered. It was, nonetheless, a good one, though Sharapova’s grand slam sweep will elude her still.


Del Torri Says:

***
Von says (regarding Glenn):
“I like Gonzalez and enjoy his game, but he and Wawrinka are akin to the North and South poles in their on-court behavior. Gonzalez’ on-court demeanor is rife with ‘baby antics’ and his speech is fraught with obscenities, in Spanish, but despite his blatant flaws, you overlook them and absolutely like him? These selective/extremist statements demonstates that your liking for Gonzalez versus your obsessive dislike for Roddick and Djokovic is NOT at all connected to your appreciation for decent behavior from ALL players, but rather an emotion stemming predominantly from an intense persona dislike for Andy and Novak. These two young men are just persona non grata figures to you and will never do or say anything that’s remotely decent in your opinion. You have stripped them of every vestige of professionalism as athletes, and/or as human beings.”
***

A similar demonstration of Glenn’s “selective/extremist statements”:

*****
Glenn says,
“Mardy Fish aside (BTW, who WOULDN’T be respectful to such a nice guy like Mardy Fish!)”
“The only ones I can think of right now who fit the bill of “heroes” are Nadal, Wawrinka, Bolleli, Fish, Kohlschreiber, Blake and Federer”

I’d now like to draw your attention to a post made in the forum “Kings of Clay” (http://kingsofclay.proboards100.com/index.cgi):
NF says:
“At Madrid last year, he said ‘I’m gonna beat his f*ckin ass’ after his opponent PHM took a lengthy injury timeout, and at the end of that match he referred to him as a ‘f*ckin shitty frenchie’. I have to admit that I found the whole sage hilarious to watch, but still that was deplorable conduct from Fish.
Against Nieminen at the Aussie Open this year, he incessantly cussed and swore following a code violation from the umpire.
At Miami 2004, during his defeat to Benneteau he shouted to his supporters ‘I cannot lose to the worst player in the draw’, and after the match he said to Benneteau at the net ‘this is the last time you’ll beat me’, and not in a jovial manner.
The guy has frequently insulted fans who have the sheer cheek to root for his opponent, and has used the f-word to address fans who are seeking his autograph at the end of matches.
If he regularly went deep at the big and televised events, he would be far more notorious than he is currently is.” [Source: http://kingsofclay.proboards100.com/index.cgi?board=pasttournamentthreads&action=display&thread=1437&page=12
*****

I suppose I feel compelled to add fuel to the fire because I am sick of these attacks on Djokovic, which I feel are absolutely unjustified. As jane once commented, I am utterly nonplussed as to why there is so much dislike of him. In every instance, it seems that his comments/actions have been completely misinterpreted by people who are itching to crucify him.


Del Torri Says:

In other words Von, regarding your comment at 11:43 PM, I empathise with you!


Del Torri Says:

Hmm, my previous comment seems to have not come through…

This is what I was referring to:

“Glenn says,
“Mardy Fish aside (BTW, who WOULDN’T be respectful to such a nice guy like Mardy Fish!)”
“The only ones I can think of right now who fit the bill of “heroes” are Nadal, Wawrinka, Bolleli, Fish, Kohlschreiber, Blake and Federer”


Del Torri Says:

And my response:

“Del Torri says,
I’d now like to draw your attention to a post made in the forum “Kings of Clay” (http://kingsofclay.proboards100.com/index.cgi):
NF says:
“At Madrid last year, he said ‘I’m gonna beat his f*ckin ass’ after his opponent PHM took a lengthy injury timeout, and at the end of that match he referred to him as a ‘f*ckin shitty frenchie’. I have to admit that I found the whole sage hilarious to watch, but still that was deplorable conduct from Fish.
Against Nieminen at the Aussie Open this year, he incessantly cussed and swore following a code violation from the umpire.
At Miami 2004, during his defeat to Benneteau he shouted to his supporters ‘I cannot lose to the worst player in the draw’, and after the match he said to Benneteau at the net ‘this is the last time you’ll beat me’, and not in a jovial manner.
The guy has frequently insulted fans who have the sheer cheek to root for his opponent, and has used the f-word to address fans who are seeking his autograph at the end of matches.
If he regularly went deep at the big and televised events, he would be far more notorious than he is currently is.” [Source: http://kingsofclay.proboards100.com/index.cgi?board=pasttournamentthreads&action=display&thread=1437&page=12


Del Torri Says:

And have a look at the fourth post of this thread: http://kingsofclay.proboards100.com/index.cgi?board=pasttournamentthreads&action=display&thread=1437&page=12

I suppose I feel compelled to add fuel to the fire because I am sick of these attacks on Djokovic, which I feel are absolutely unjustified. As jane once commented, I am utterly nonplussed as to why there is so much dislike of him. In every instance, it seems that his comments/actions have been completely misinterpreted by people who are itching to crucify him.


jane Says:

Del Torri,

“As jane once commented, I am utterly nonplussed as to why there is so much dislike of him.”

Who knows? For some, I am sure it’s an honest dislike,i.e., something about Djokovic truly disagrees with, irks or rubs them the wrong way. And that’s fine, but a balanced perspective doesn’t hurt either. (For example, you point out evidence that contrasts with what had been said previously about Fish.) For others, I’ve occasionally wondered if it’s because Novak’s risen so quickly in the last year to really challenge the top two, especially on hardcourts, and Federer and Rafa have very faithful fans. Which is great.

Still, I think this is good for tennis generally to have a bit more going on in the way of rivalries, as well as personalities, at the top echelons of the game. Variety in personality & style will only attract more & different fans; good competition will only create more exciting matches & tournaments.


Von Says:

“Del Torri Says:
In other words Von, regarding your comment at 11:43 PM, I empathise with you!”

I believe a part of your comment is missing, as you stated it did not come through. What did you say in the entire post. Please elaborate. Thanks.


Del Torri Says:

Von, see my comments immediately succeeding that particular post. You are right, my original post didn’t come through. Essentially, I believe I feel the same way (hence, ‘empathise’) about Djokovic as you do about Roddick, especially regarding your final paragraph in your response to Glenn.


jane Says:

Del Torri,

Glenn simply dislikes Novak; in the past he said he’d feel differently if he saw Djoko behaving well on court (that is, to his standards; I suspect a list is in order: no number 1 gestures allowed, no turning one’s back in awe of a shot, no pounding one’s chest, no challenging an umpire, no slamming one’s racquet…and so on and so forth). However, now, after I pointed out how sportsmanlike Djoko was while playing Mathieu, he’s modified that statement thusly: only when Djoko “behaves” well when playing his “MAIN” rivals will Glenn come round. Hmmmm….

One suspects Novak will never be up to snuff for Glenn, and that’s fine if he’d only admit it. But if he uses Fish and Gonzalez as icons for “proper” (or “heroic”) behaviour, then the argument begins to crumble, as first Von and now you have pointed out.

The point is that ALL of the players have flaws and perhaps we notice the flaws most in the player’s we dislike for whatever reason. It’s more challenging to try to find “the good” as Plato put it.


Von Says:

Del Torri:

Thanks for the explanation and your empathy. I suppose according to some, we are fans of the very worse kind of tennis players. I understand that we are all entitled to our preferences and/or opinions, but how can anyone be so obsessed with beating up on two athletes such as Roddick and Djokovic even when the topic is not about them — it blows my mind. Every post has an unrelated dangling participle or an appositive thrown in to belittle these guys. It’s pathetic. What’s most baffling to me concerns the fact that there’s admiration by the same critics for athletes whose behaviors are much more obnoxious than that of Djokovic and Roddick — hence, a double standard.


Von Says:

jane:

As I mentioned in my post to Glenn, when this onslaught of unjustified criticsms began I looked upon them as an attempt by him to inject humor into his posts — a light banter between him and myself. However, it became apparent that he was/is serious. Moreover, I’ve come to realize that it’s an OCD sort of behavior and is now a hobby for him to indulge in such a degrading exchange. This is upsetting for me; I cannot fathom anyone deriving any kind of pleasure repeatedly, on a daily basis assinating another’s character for mere joy. I’m dumbfounded!


Von Says:

sorry, typo, last line “assinating” should be assassinating.


Skorocel Says:

Julien “United Colors of” Benneteau? LOL :)


Glenn Says:

Hahaha! Thanks for all your comments!

Von,
I’ve never hidden my dislike for Roddick. It all started last year when, after a win, he made a comment about wanting to mix it with the ladies after his match. Keep those kinds of comments in the locker room. He has a greater responsibility as a sports figure. In my impression, he is a pig. As the father of a daughter, well – I’m not sure you can understand my reaction. Before that time (when I wasn’t really a tennis fan and just heard about this guy with an unbelievable serve), I was just as impressed with his athleticism as anyone else. When I started watching more tennis, I got to see what he was like. Like I said, he’s a pig and a baby.

Del Torri,
Thanks for those eye-opening facts! Never knew any of that. Sports commentators are always mentioning what a nice guy he is. So I’ve always based my opinion on that. Thanks, once again!:) You’ve certainly changed my mind about him.

Jane,
I don’t know why you find my comment regarding your attempt to put Djokovic in a good light as surprising. I made the same comment many days ago. Perhaps you never read it. Anyway, to repeat, once I see him acting in a sportsmanlike way to his MAIN rivals ON COURT, then and only then will I change my mind about him. I guess you don’t have much faith in Djokovic to change if you think I will NEVER change my mind about him. Ironic!

BTW, your catena of actions from Djokovic that I don’t like should exclude the chest pumping. I’ve never mentioned that, and I don’t know why you’re putting words in my mouth. I think that’s OK behavior from an athlete.

All the other ones I can do without, and I’m sure many others feel the same way. They just take away from the class act that tennis is. You’re sounding like one of those blind Djokovic fans who think he can do nothing wrong. Objecting to an umpire is fine. Giving him dirty looks


Glenn Says:

Hahaha! Thanks for all your comments!

Von,
I’ve never hidden my dislike for Roddick. It all started last year when, after a win, he made a comment about wanting to mix it with the ladies after his match. Keep those kinds of comments in the locker room. He has a greater responsibility as a sports figure. In my impression, he is a pig. As the father of a daughter, well – I’m not sure you can understand my reaction. Before that time (when I wasn’t really a tennis fan and just heard about this guy with an unbelievable serve), I was just as impressed with his athleticism as anyone else. When I started watching more tennis, I got to see what he was like. Like I said, he’s a pig and a baby.

Del Torri,
Thanks for those eye-opening facts! Never knew any of that. Sports commentators are always mentioning what a nice guy he is. So I’ve always based my opinion on that. Thanks, once again!:) You’ve certainly changed my mind about him.

Jane,
I don’t know why you find my comment regarding your attempt to put Djokovic in a good light as surprising. I made the same comment many days ago. Perhaps you never read it. Anyway, to repeat, once I see him acting in a sportsmanlike way to his MAIN rivals ON COURT, then and only then will I change my mind about him. I guess you don’t have much faith in Djokovic to change if you think I will NEVER change my mind about him. Ironic!

BTW, your catena of actions from Djokovic that I don’t like should exclude the chest pumping. I’ve never mentioned that, and I don’t know why you’re putting words in my mouth. I think that’s OK behavior from an athlete.

All the other ones I can do without, and I’m sure many others feel the same way. They just take away from the class act that tennis is. You’re sounding like one of those blind Djokovic fans who think he can do nothing wrong. Objecting to an umpire is fine. Giving him dirty looks continuously after the fact is not. I’m rather surprised you have lost sight of the difference.

Breaking your racquets is not OK by ANYONE’s standards (except perhaps your own and other Djokovic fans). That is why players are cited for it. You don’t seem to appreciate that tennis is a sport of control and class, if you feel warranted on criticing my dislike of when Djokovic does it.

I stand by my dislike for the other actions you mentioned. They are unsportsmanlike. If you just want to overlook them, that’s fine.


Glenn Says:

OOPS! Just noticed a repeated post. Sorry! Hope the mod deletes the first one (at 12:09 a.m.).


jane Says:

Glenn,

“then and only then will I change my mind about him. I guess you don’t have much faith in Djokovic to change if you think I will NEVER change my mind about him.”

What’s utterly silly is that you seem to think the #3 player in the world has to change to suit you. I like Djokovic as he is, faults and all; why would I need to have “faith” in him to change? Most people change, grow and mature.

I had thought the chest thumping comment was from you; my apologies if not.

Strike it from the list. But simultaneously add to the list that a player cannot joke about meeting girls either – then they are “a pig”.

Anything else we should add? Maybe you should write a book? “Glenn’s Guide to ON COURT Tennis Etiquette”

LOL!


jane Says:

Why is tennis a “class act”? I don’t understand this. It’s a democratic sport, open to all classes and all types, and that’s what makes it fun and great and exciting. How boring if all players behaved the same.

If a player breaks a rule (smashes a racquet [not the same as tossing it on the ground, which is fine], swears, takes too long between serves) then fine, they should be penalized or at least warned.

But you’re talking about “quibbles,” things that don’t really matter. So what if Roddick jokes about meeting girls? So what if Novak raises his finger after winning or making a good shot? It’s not hurting anyone or affecting the match.


Von Says:

Glenn:

“In my impression, he is a pig. As the father of a daughter, well – I’m not sure you can understand my reaction.”

With this answer, ends my posts on what you perceive to be Roddick’s unprofessional behavior as a tennis athlete. To be truthful, it has become old. You are free to call him whatever name you choose — I won’t be the one to defend him.

I don’t understand what you mean by “I’m not sure you can understand my reaction.” Believe me, I do. I have 2 children, one (1) male, one (1) female, and I do understand that it’s every parent’s desire to protect their children from the wrong type of influence. However, it is baffling to me that you are such a stickler for proper behavior from public figures, while at the same time you refer to one of those figures as “a pig”. I sincerely hope that you do not openly express such thinking in front of your daughter. If you do, you are teaching her to indulge in name calling, and to think of men, including yourself as “pigs”. Moreover, to consistently wish for evil circumstances to befall another, is also teaching your child to be inhumane, uncharitable and crude, but more importantly, she will grow up thinking that this train of thought is normal.

For Roddick to mention that he wants to “mix it with the ladies”, is a normal male heterosexual statement. Believe me, your daugther will hear worse, however, it will be up to you to provide clarification of what’s acceptable as opposed to unacceptable language and behavior. I wish you well in the upbringing of your daugther — you’re in for quite a few surprises.


Glenn Says:

OH Jane, how you have sunk. When I first came on here, you were touted as a symbol of fairness, but I see that is not the case.

When I don’t like certain behavior from players, all of a sudden, that means that the player must change to suit ME. I guess in your world, no one can have an opinion without automatically being regarded as domineering? Let me tell you something, Jane. I don’t give a whit if they change or not. I call it as it is. If they change, I’ll like them, if they don’t, I won’t – simple as that. No need to make snide indirect commentaries about me. Show me just one place when I stated that Djokovic HAD to change. He is who he is. But I’ll call him on his behavior when I don’t like it (if that’s OK with you, Queen Jane). I guess you’ve never complained about someone’s behavior.

But I see a little judgment coming from your own pen, wouldn’t you know. Your hypocrisy is glaring.

And BTW, YOU’RE not a guy. When guys make comments like Roddick’s, it means he’s a player. I was like that when I was young. I don’t like players, and when you go around as a public figure making it seem OK, then I consider that WORSE. People like you who don’t seem to be willing to let public figures have any kind of responsibliity for their actions and their possible effects — well, I’ll just say it’s my opinion that people with such laissez-faire attitude do not make this world a better place to live.

I can’t believe you’re saying Roddick’s comment about “mixing it up with the ladies” is not harming anyone. Just the POSSIBILITY that it could be misinterpreted to mean that women are just objects for men’s pleasure is not acceptable. Roddick should be more responsible with his statements as a public figure. I guess that doesn’t really matter to you (or Von).

And the #1 sign. Is it good to be arrogant? Is it good to be haughty? What example are you setting as a public sports figure, especially to impressionable little kids? Haughtiness and arrogance never leads to anything good (but I guess it might to you). In any case, I had more of an issue with the fact that he made himself out to be a fool by sporting that sign around so much and then not even being able to back it up. In my book, you shut up or put up – be humble or be able to back up your boasts. He couldn’t do either.

Well, ladies, unless you have anything more to say, I suggest we get back to the Tennis.


Glenn Says:

BTW, Jane:

In the United States (where I reside), “class act” refers to high quality behavior, not societal grade. Hope that clarifies it.


Glenn Says:

Von,

I hope to instill in my daughter the ability to distinguish between pigs and normal men. If my daughter ever brought home a guy who makes boasts about “mixing it with the ladies,” he’d be out of the house in a heartbeat.

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