Bat-s**t Crazy Wimbledon Day Sees Off Federer, Sets Records
by Staff | June 26th, 2013, 11:04 pm
  • 213 Comments

Where to begin?

Wednesday at Wimbledon was a bloodbath never before seen at the All England Club — between former champions and former No. 1s exiting, coupled with a record (at any Slam, ever) seven injury retirements in one day, you half expected the lawns to start running red.

Former No. 1 and seven-time champion Roger Federer exited on Day 3. Former champ Maria Sharapova. Caroline Wozniacki. Victoria Azarenka. Ana Ivanovic. John Isner. And that’s just the beginning.

Federer failed to reach his first Slam quarterfinal in nine years when he was shocked by No. 116-ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky 6-7(5), 7-6(5), 7-5, 7-6(5).

“I’m still in disbelief that actually happened,” said Stakhovsky, who mixed in some masterful serve-and-volley on the lawns that seem quicker (and slicker) in 2013. “Beating Roger on his court where he is a legend is special. He’s the greatest player, the biggest name, and a decent man everyone admires. I couldn’t play any better. I played my best tennis and still it was almost not enough to beat Roger Federer.”

Federer remained classy and upbeat while retaining his sense of humor in defeat.

“It doesn’t feel like the end of an era for me because I still have plans to play for many more years to come,” said the Swiss. “Some [Slam] finals haven’t hurt this much. At least having lost I didn’t have to go through a trophy ceremony with this one.”

Other Top 10 seeds out Wednesday were No. 6 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga retiring against Ernests Gulbis after the third set citing a knee injury, and No. 10 Marin Cilic gifting France’s Kenny De Schepper a walkover citing a knee injury.

No. 2 seed Andy Murray was amazingly the only Top 10-seeded player in action through to the next round, defeating Taipei’s Yen-Hsun Lu 6-3, 6-3, 7-5. He will next meet No. 32 seed Tommy Robredo.

“[Robredo] had a good win today against [Nicolas] Mahut, who has been playing well on the grass,” Murray said. “He’s very, very experienced. He’s extremely fit. He won three matches in a row at the French from two sets to love down. He fights right until the last point. He’s been in the Top 20 in the world for a number of years. He knows how to win tennis matches. So it’s a tough match for me.”

Other seeded casualties were No. 18 John Isner retiring in the first set with a left knee injury against France’s Adrian Mannarino, and Spain’s Fernando “Hot Sauce” Verdasco beating No. 31 Julien Benneteau in straights in a match that was actually finished without anyone leaving on a stretcher.

The Nadal-killer Steve Darcis was another injury casualty Wednesday, failing to take to the court in granting a walkover to Poland’s Lukas Kubot, citing a right shoulder injury.

Unseeded former champ Lleyton Hewitt looked like he was potentially ready to do some damage during Week One before running up against the hot-handed serve-and-volleying Jamaican-turned-German qualifier Dustin Brown, who walked away with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-7(3), 6-2 win.

“I cried like a little girl,” laughed Brown about his reaction following the match. “I’m just happy and emotional and everything. I have a lot of friends here, my coach is here, my girlfriend is here. I’m very happy about everything. It’s just been a very long way. I’m just happy that I actually got through the match.”

The shriek-fest that was Sharapova and Portuguese qualifier Michelle Larcher de Brito saw Sharapova fall three times on the grass in a 6-3, 6-4 loss where she was out-hit and out-shrieked.

“I don’t think I’ve ever fallen three times in a match before in my career, so that was a little strange,” said the No. 3 seed Sharapova, who was treated for her knee after one fall. “But that’s certainly not an excuse. I think today I’ve seen a lot of players fall and take a few hits and a few injuries. So I think that’s just part of the game, part of what we have to deal with.”

The No. 9-seeded Wozniacki tweaked her ankle in a fall during a 6-2, 6-2 loss to Czech qualifier Petra Cetkovska, and No. 12 and possibly too-thin former No. 1 Ana Ivanovic was likewise out-played by Canadian rising teen Eugenie Bouchard.

“We only heard about the court change 15 minutes before the match,” said Bouchard on her match being moved to center court, winning in roughly an hour. “I was actually quite excited. It was crazy to play in front of a big crowd like this. I’m really happy…I think any day I can beat anyone. It’s just about playing the way I know I can play.”

In other Top 10 action, No. 2 Victoria Azarenka withdrew from the tournament with a right knee injury before facing Flavia Pennetta, and No. 8 Petra Kvitova received a free pass into the third round from Yaroslava Shvedova, who withdrew from the tournament citing a right arm injury.

ESPN in their coverage did an excellent analysis of players with poor grasscourt footwork falling, showing players taking giant lunging steps and attempting to slide on the grass as if it were red clay, compared to players taking smaller steps and having no issues on the grass.

“There has been a high number of withdrawals at The Championships today and we sympathize with all the players affected,” said Richard Lewis, chief executive of The All England Club in a statement covering their asses. “The withdrawals have occurred for a variety of reasons, but there has been some suggestion that the court surface is to blame. We have no reason to think this is the case. Indeed, many players have complimented us on the very good condition of the courts.”

Other women’s upsets on the day were Serb Vesna Dolonc taking out No. 16 Jelena Jankovic, Italian riser Camila Giorgi edging No. 22 Sorana Cirstea in two tiebreaks, and Italian Karin Knapp outlasting No. 27 Lucie Safarova after losing the first set.

Seeds avoiding the prevalent upset bug in three-set victories were No. 17 Sloane Stephens over German wildcard Andrea Petkovic 8-6 in the final set, No. 19 Carla Suarez Navarro rebounding from a 6-1 first set loss to defeat Croatian Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, and No. 25 Ekaterina Makarova outlasting Spain’s Garbine Muguruza.

Matches to watch for Thursday on the lawns are (1) Novak Djokovic vs. American journeyman Bobby Reynolds, (1) Serena Williams vs. French riser Caroline Garcia, (23) Sabine Lisicki vs. the grass-adept Russian Elena Vesnina, the likely-grass-adept Simona Halep vs. (6) Na Li, two guys who neglected to ditch their childhood names in (13) Tommy Haas vs. Jimmy Wang of Taipei, American veteran James Blake vs. Bernard “The Tank Engine” Tomic, (17) Milos Raonic vs. Dutch riser Igor Sijsling, rusher-and-crusher Michael Llodra vs. (23) Andreas Seppi (upset lock of the day), and Madison Keys vs. (30) Mona Barthel.

TENNIS-X NEWS, NOTES, QUOTES AND BARBS

Dutchwoman Arantxa Rus, who beat Kim Clijsters at the 2011 French Open, has now after her first-round loss at Wimbledon lost a record 17 tour matches in a row. WTA officials say it ties the record of American Sandy Collins who lost 17 tour matches in a row from 1984-87…John Isner on men’s relationships on tour compared to the women (see: Serena vs. Maria): “I was just next to Roger [Federer] in the showers and we were talking about [pro wrestling] because he’s really into it, just like I am. We all get along pretty well. It’s totally different with the women.” — They don’t talk about pro wrestling? In the shower?…Jelena Jankovic laments the lack of friendships on the women’s tour: “I don’t understand that part and that’s why life on the tour can be very lonely because there are not a lot of friendships…there are players who don’t want to have anything to do with anyone and I think later in life they will have problems. You might be a successful player that people respect, but when you put your racket down what do you have? You have no friends and no one at all. Maybe your team is friends with you now because they work for you, but who will you have when they aren’t working for you anymore?”…21-year-old Czech twin sisters Kristyna and Karolina Pliskova said they switched boyfriends once when they were teens. Share and share alike…The National Obesity Forum is calling out Maria Sharapova for selling her “Sugarpova” candy. “Maria promoting her sugary sweets is OK but only if she makes clear that you can only eat sweets like that every day and look like her if you are playing tennis 15 hours a day,” said Tam Fry, a member of the National Obesity Forum, speaking to Reuters. — You’re on the National Obesity Forum and your last name is fry, which is rich…Serena Williams is continuing her apology tour for saying that the Steubenville rape victim, a 16 year old, got what she deserved because she was drinking. According to Rolling Stone, Serena told the reporter, “They [the high school football players who raped the girl] did something stupid, but I don’t know. I’m not blaming the girl, but if you’re a 16-year-old and you’re drunk like that, your parents should teach you: Don’t take drinks from other people. She’s 16, why was she that drunk where she doesn’t remember? It could have been much worse. She’s lucky. Obviously, I don’t know, maybe she wasn’t a virgin, but she shouldn’t have put herself in that position, unless they slipped her something, then that’s different.” The subtext there if you missed it: It’s the parents’ fault, she might be a slut anyways, and by drinking she set herself up for rape. Serena wrote on her website, “For someone to be raped, and at only sixteen, is such a horrible tragedy!”…The Tennis Channel is still considering an appear to the U.S. Supreme Court after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia overturned a previous ruling that Comcast cable had discriminated against Tennis Channel by keeping it on a paid tier, while keeping the Comcast-owned sports channels like NBC Sports Network and the Golf Channel on basic cable. The Federal Communications Commission had originally ruled that Comcast was in the wrong and was putting Tennis Channel at a competitive disadvantage. “This could be absolutely devastating financially to the Tennis Channel,” said media analyst Derek Baine of consulting firm SNL Kagan. “This move, getting into more Comcast homes, was going to move the Tennis Channel up to the next level, but it is tough to get traction when you are an independent channel.”…The players say there is too much drug testing and complain about having to send in “whereabout” reports three months in advance, but ESPN says the ITF’s implementation of the drug testing program is a joke. Which is it? According to ESPN: “…tennis doesn’t have a lot doping cases because it doesn’t do a lot of testing. The International Tennis Federation ordered just 63 out-of-competition blood tests last year, compared to more than 3,000 that were performed in the sport of cycling. (When all tests were included, the 611 players were tested 2,185 times, or 3.3 times per player, compared to an average of nine times per rider in cycling.) But that’s only part of the problem facing a sport in which the players are more powerful than ever and able to demand pay hikes, such as the 40 percent raise that will go into effect at Wimbledon.”…American Madison Keys tells TENNIS magazine that the current generation of USTA Professional Development-training girls are much like the Agassi-Courier generation that pushed each other at the Bollettieri Academy: “We really are. I think it especially helps that we’re all training together, because we’re able to push each other every single day. We see each other all the time. There’s me, Jamie Hampton, Taylor Townsend, Vicky Duval and Melanie [Oudin]. And then there’s Grace Min and Shelby Rogers, and even Allie Will comes sometimes. I think it’s very rare that you find a group of girls who are competitive against each other but are all friends. We travel together and do things together. We basically come in as a pack.”…Former Swiss player Marc Rosset tells Reuters he doesn’t like — seeding 32 players at Slams: “The priority of tournament directors is to protect them (the seeded players) so they have a good match at the weekend. With 32 seeded players, there is no big match. You can’t have Rafael Nadal vs. John Isner in the first round of Wimbledon. We used to say the women’s tournaments would start in the quarterfinals. It’s becoming the same with men’s tournaments.”; or the standardization of surfaces: “If you take a final at Roland Garros or Wimbledon, it’s almost the same. Grass got slower as clay got quicker — so you always see the same players…[Pete] Sampras would not win seven titles on today’s [Wimbledon] surface and Nadal would not win Wimbledon on the previous grass. [Andre] Agassi who beat [Goran] Ivanisevic at Wimbledon (1992) was brilliant but since then they slowed the surface down.”

 


Also Check Out:
Rafael Nadal: Dolgopolov Is A Crazy Player
Rafael Nadal: “Thinking About Winning Another Title Here In Wimbledon Is Arrogant And Crazy”
Yaroslava Shvedova Records “Golden Set” In Win Over Sara Errani At Wimbledon
Longest Winning Streaks in Men’s Tennis – Open Era
Isner v. Mahut Match Setting Tennis Records, But It’s Not Over Yet

Don't miss any tennis action, stay connected with Tennis-X

Get Tennis-X news FREE in your inbox every day

213 Comments for Bat-s**t Crazy Wimbledon Day Sees Off Federer, Sets Records

Humble Rafa Says:

I went a concert today.


Michael Says:

That insane quarter final streak of Roger had to come to an end someday and yesterday it happened ironically on his most favoured surface. I anticipated it either in Rolland Garros or the Australian Open quite not at Wimbledon where Roger has ruled as the King. But, it is evident that the days of Roger’s domination is slowly coming to an end. This time round I didn’t have great expectations from Roger. I thought at best he would maintain the streak but would fall to Rafa in the quarters. However, when the shocker came in the form of Rafa’s exit, I thought Roger would be able to reach the semi-finals atleast. But Stakhovsky had other plans and he played as one inspired and felled the Great Roger. The silver lining is that he didn’t lose it badly and was in the reckoning in all the sets. It is the big points which made the difference in the end and Roger didn’t live up to it. That is the difference between the Roger of yore and Roger of present. In his hey days he would have found out some way to win the match with his magical touch. That is not working today. Nevertheless, Roger wasn’t too much upset with the defeat and has expressed his desire to carry on. Well, he can move on but he has to be conscious of his advanced age factor and the difference it could make to his Tennis.


Michael Says:

Crazy Wimbledon. Well, the title suits it with the kind of withdrawals, pull outs, gigantic upsets both in men’s and women’s competition, dampness and the slippery surface which many players have complained of. This Wimbledon will be notoriously recalled throughout the Tennis History. May be the Wimbledon Authorities have to relook at the surface and make some amends to clear the players apprehensions. All in all, it really is crazy. We are just in the second round and we already have Roger, Rafa, Tsonga and Wawrinka eliminated.


rafaeli Says:

Wimbledon should change to balance the slams out -2 on h/c and 2 on clay.

Perfect!


the DA Says:

Yesterday should be renamed “TheRedWimbledon” episode.


Colin Says:

@ rafaeli:
Or better still, a lot of players should learn how to play on grass, namely they should not move as if they were on clay. It’s explained in the article.
The sport is called “lawn tennis” for a reason, and the day grass is abandoned is the day I, for one, shall stop following it.


Margot Says:

Hewitt said that the grass is just the same as it always is, first week. Always slippier. Players have turned up expecting it to play like clay and of course it doesn’t. Nor have all the injuries just been caused at Wimbles.
In a couple of years there’ll be more chance for players to tune up on grass.


the DA Says:

Interesting take on yesterday from Andy in his BBC column, particularly the comments about movement and adjusting to grass:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/23067434


the DA Says:

Hay Margot, you’ve been scarce around these parts. Are you as spooked as I am with all that has happened?


Margot Says:

@ the DA
Really busy. Bad timing.
Just the most exciting Wimbledon EVER!
No, not “spooked.” Not superstitious. Just fingers crossed for an Andole final.
Though Berdych, Delpotro, Ferrer, Gulbis and Mr Sytakovsky will all be tuning their antennae no doubt ;)
Our man looks lean and mean by the way. I like that “look” verrry much :)
Go Andy!


Margot Says:

@ the DA
Just read that from Andy. In fact Jo Duries was talking about Sharapova’s loss and said she takes big steps on grass which makes it hard to move/stop/change direction. Whereas the woman who beat her said she consciously adjusted and started taking much smaller steps. Also said there was only one bad patch on court and of course she tried to avoid it.
She was lovely in interview and then they showed a bit of the match and she shrieks louder than Maria!
Yikes! The spectators must’ve needed ear plugs.


the DA Says:

@Margot – the Sharapova match was terrible to listen to. I’ve become accustomed to Maria’s shrieks but De Brito is even worse. No audio for me.


the DA Says:

Haha…Sloane Stephens has a great tweet about yesterday:

“So I survived yesterday’s Wimblegeddon.”


Ty Says:

Does anyone know of any surprise PED testing being administered this year at Wimby? These mass retirements and half-assed attempts cannot all be coincidence.


JF Says:

Ty – Thats worth a thought…You never know.


jane Says:

Gasquet just served up a bagel.


Ty Says:

JF: Well, I suppose we might know a couple of months down the road. However the ATP has long been rumored by the most hardcore of cynics to sweep under the rug failed tests and the sort.


jane Says:

Berdych, Tomic and Delpo are through. As is Serena.


jane Says:

Only one retirement so far that I can see: Llodra. So things seem to have calmed down today.

Lisicki is an interesting one to watch on the ladies’ side.


Ty Says:

Rafa sure blew the scene quickly.


Ty Says:

I hope Gulbis wins Wimbledon.


rafaeli Says:

I hear you Colin, it is called Lawn Tennis but grass is marginalised now. They might as well go the whole hog and abandon it.

Turn Wimbledon to clay so we’ll have 67 months of h/c and 5 months of clay.


jane Says:

I disagree. They should lengthen the grass season and preserve the tradition, which is a wonderful one for the sport, regardless of what happened yesterday. The should add another 2 weeks at least to the lead up to Wimbledon and that would allow for Halle and Queens to remain as is, plus a grass masters could be added (or one of the above tourneys changed to a masters).


Ty Says:

How in the world can Raonic fail to be prolific on grass? It’s mind boggling.

He’s down a set and BP


Polo Says:

Raonic cannot move. His chances of winning any major is very slim.


Ty Says:

He’s a bit slow, sure. But Phillippousis wasn’t exactly Hewitt out there and still managed to reach the Wimbledon final.


Brando Says:

FO end – 2 weeks off for everyone- Queens/ Halle moved upto 500 pt events – week off – Wimby. That would be perfect schedule IMO. Gives everyone a chance to switch from clay to grass as well as they can, to take time off from a brutal 2 months solid of clay, and also gives the grass season extended period of interest. Queens and Halle are too small to be MS events, but 500 pt events is fairly ok.


Polo Says:

Gasquet is showing us another of his trademark brilliant-crappy mix of tennis.


jane Says:

Yeah, I have my doubts about Raonic. He’s in a bit of trouble today, but Milos being upset wouldn’t surprise me that much. He hasn’t really done much at the slams. And besides his movement, I think Raonic’s return needs work.

For some reason, his opponent, Sijsling, reminds me of Staks, from certain angles anyhow.Hmmm, telling?


RZ Says:

I’m guessing today will be quite boring.


Polo Says:

Jane, please, don’t mention that name.


Ty Says:

@Polo

Well at least he’s been consistent throughout his career :).

Brilliance to mediocre at the drop of a tennis ball.

He would be another I’d like to see hoist the trophy. He’s always been a good grass court player. I remember him coming off a hot-streak of winning the grass tune up three consecutive years and then drawing Roger in the first round of Wimby and getting absolutely blitzed breadsticks and bagels alike. Could be his last chance here to make a little noise. Which means he’ll probably bow out to Go in five sets.


jane Says:

Aww, sorry Polo.

BTW, I liked your post about the twins on the other thread. I think even pets can help in that way; Nole said that after the epic FO semi loss, when he went home, his dog Pierre jumped up on him, & he felt a little better. Hokey, maybe, but true. :)


Ty Says:

Discount Roger Federer is in a tight one with Zemlja (whoever that is!! where do these guys come from?). Serving to stay in the fourth.


Ty Says:

@Jane

I agree with you 100%.


Polo Says:

Dimitrov has been getting a lot of hype since he started. However, does he give anybody a feeling that he will someday be a truly great player the way Federer, Nadal and Djokovic did when they fisrt showed on the scene?


RZ Says:

It would be nice to see Gasquet make it far in this tournament. He’s an excellent grasscourt player, and has really turned his career around the last year. He hasn’t quite gone from “also-ran” to “contender” yet, but could change that with this tournament.


jane Says:

Dimitrov lacks the struff. Oh wait, no, that’s Chardy’s opponent. Ha ha – who is struff? And what does Dimitrov lack anyhow? Is it power? Gumption? He’s fit, he moves well, he has wonderful touch, he has a complete game, so what?


Ty Says:

@Polo

I’ve never had that impression personally. I can’t remember which commentator it was, possibly J-Mac (cringe) saying that throughout his career he had never seen a guy make it big who had replicated another top player’s game.


Brando Says:

Nadal/ Federer level? No chance. Djokovic level? Why not? A former choker/retirement king turned slam performer: who saw that coming? No one! Novak capitalised age 24. By the time Dimitrov gets there the likes of Djokovic, Murray will be 28, an age that slowly but surely (historically speaking) most big guns start to decline. Definitely in comparison to hey day. Once Grigor hits that sweet spot of age 24, the top will not look as daunting for him IMO. I still back him for sure.


Ty Says:

Gasquet always gave me the impression of a man who is uncomfortable with how talented he is. The moment his talent draws significant attention, he crumbles.


Polo Says:

Agree with you guys. Dimitrov has that Gasquet essence about him.


jane Says:

Dimitrov is 22 and has never won an ATP title. Has Dimitrov even reached a slam quarterfinal? I can’t recall.

Nole reached the USO finals and then won the AO when he was 20 and he won WTF at 21 years old. He was the youngest ever to win the Miami masters at 19 years old, and the youngest ever to reach the semis or deeper at all the slams. I’d say he capitalized before age 24.

Dimitrov could still break through, but he should be looking to win a title – any title – first!


grendel Says:

Dimitrov is lightweight, both physically and mentally. I’d rate Nishikori higher – trouble is, always injured.


rivkin Says:

federer just needs to hit through his returns more and backhand as he chipped and stabbed on the backhand side. would love to see federer with doublehanded backhand as very few cope with just single handed now.


Brando Says:

LOL@ overly sensitive fans.


Ben Pronin Says:

Djokovic was a grand slam champion at the age of 20. His choking and retirement stuff is irrelevant considering how many titles he amassed despite those shenanigans. Dimitrov has 0 titles. I want him to be a great player, but to say that he can easily get to Djokovic’s level is utterly disrespectful and overlooking a crap ton of factors.


Ben Pronin Says:

Well let’s just clarify that Federer/Nadal is not a single level. There’s Nadal’s level, then there’s a few levels up where Federer resides.


jane Says:

Lightweight physically grendel? Do you mean power-wise? The guy is 6’2″ and he’s not overly lanky. But I get what you mean mentally. I think he needs more drive.

Maybe he’s like Gasquet – and what Ty says about him: “The moment his talent draws significant attention, he crumbles.”

That seems like it could be true.


Brando Says:

3 BPs down the swanny for Grigor.


Brando Says:

Nice hold Mr Shazza!


Brando Says:

What a lob Grigor!


Ty Says:

Pressure time for young Grigor..


Long Live The King Says:

“Well let’s just clarify that Federer/Nadal is not a single level. There’s Nadal’s level, then there’s a few levels up where Federer resides.”

Bravo! +1 to that.


the DA Says:

Come on Grigor! Who is this Zamlja and why has it gone to a 5th set? He better not blow this golden opportunity to make a run here.

On another note, some nice words from Andy on Federer:

Murray: don’t write off Federer

“Andy Murray has backed Roger Federer to be a force at Wimbledon again and thinks it will be a long time before anyone gets close to the Swiss great’s grand slam quarter-final record.”

http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/tennis/murray-dont-write-off-federer.1372344877


jane Says:

“Who is this Zamlja?” DA – I was curious too so I looked him up; he’s ranked #55 but I hadn’t really heard of him either. He’s around 26-27 I think.

Dimitrov should prevail though. I would be good to see him meet delPo next round.


Kimberly Says:

we are only on 2 retirements today—llodra and matheui


Long Live The King Says:

I would say Janowicz – that polish psycho dude or Raonic inspire more confidence than Dimitrov/Tomic.

I like Goffin too, he could sneak a slam like chang/hewitt – though physically he’s at a disadvantage compared to the big ones.


Ty Says:

Think of all those players who barely missed the cut, sitting at home or on some lonely practice court, watching these players give up with such little fight or no fight.


the DA Says:

Oh Grigor!


Ty Says:

Well, he’s fighting. That’s a good sign. 2 MP saved for Grigor.


Ben Pronin Says:

Goffin is not going to sneak any slams. Let’s wait for him to sneak a slam semi.

I’m plenty pissed that Dimitrov is blowing this match, but at least this proves he’s plenty fit.


Ty Says:

On the flip side, Gasquet is going through his normal routine of letting lesser players back in the match. He’s down a SP


the DA Says:

Lucky Zemlja didn’t challenge that ball on MP – it looked out.


Polo Says:

I like Dimitrov the way I like Gasquet. So I am bound to feel a lot of frustration when I watch them play. Those two belong to a category of their own.


Polo Says:

It would be interesting to watch Gasquet and Dimitrov play against each other.


Ty Says:

@Polo

With Sigmund Freud in the chair.


jane Says:

Polo they did! And one of them was cramping and the other was throwing up. For your viewing pleasure:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HR6BC_4W0Io


Ty Says:

@Jane

Thank you. The soundtrack made that video.

Damn, tennis players always look like such wusses.


the DA Says:

@Jane – You beat me to it. Such a memorable moment.


Polo Says:

Oh, Jane! That’s a gem of a laugh. Thank you.


Ty Says:

Raonic seems to be putting up a fight in the third. Good on him.


Ben Pronin Says:

OMG that is the funniest thing I’ve ever seen.


Ty Says:

Yes, thank you Jane. My other office mates are all looking at me strangely after my impromptu burst of joyous laughter…and I was holding back too. Good stuff.


grendel Says:

9-9 and drizzle stops play. At 7-6, I think, match point and Dimitov hit a ball that looked long, but Zemja carried on playing – to his own dismay.

Dimitrov’s serving is very impressive and it’s why he is still in the match. Otherwise, some flashy points, including a wonderful lob – but all the grit is coming from the other end.


Long Live The King Says:

“I like Dimitrov the way I like Gasquet. So I am bound to feel a lot of frustration when I watch them play. Those two belong to a category of their own.”

Polo:

A lot of times people have unreasonable expectations from players for personal reasons. There is a very good reason, Gasquet has never achieved a lot of success – His movement is below par. I don’t even think he is even the top 10 best movers on tour. Tennis is more of a moving sport and great legs will get you greater success than great hands.

Nadal’s superior movement has got him much more success than andy murray, whose movement is inferior to Nadal, but Murrays has got greater skills with the hands]

Similar thing for Ferrer, a poor man’s Nadal and Gasquet – a poor man’s Murray.

People did similar things with Safin. They expected some really ridiculous stuff from him, but his movement was a notch below Federer and in safin’s case, he also does not have the same love/passion for tennis that Federer/Nadal have.

I used to be frustrated watching Federer/Safin around 2001/2002, but they have made me wiser and I admire each other for what they bring. I have not been as frustrated with Gasquet/Dimitrov because my understanding of the game is better. I am also a regular tennis player these 10years and my own challenges on court help me view these guys in better light and acknowledge the great things they bring and not get pulled down by the negatives, which I admit are overwhelming at times.

Apologies for the long and winded post.


Ty Says:

Ranoic, another ‘future top player’ going out with a whimper to a no-namer.


the DA Says:

More misery for Milos. Raonic out in straights.


the DA Says:

I have a nervous feeling about Dimitrov not being able to take his match either. I hope not.


jane Says:

Raonic is sunk; the “Dutch riser Igor Sijsling” makes good.

Glad everyone enjoyed that video. Yep Ty; the sound editors should be nominated for something, hee hee.


Polo Says:

Dimitrov will probably follow Raonic. Then Gasquet will again lose in five. Well, back to back days of frustration for me. I have yet to reach the Zen level of tennis watching.


grendel Says:

Sijsling is going around pulling faces, brandishing his fist, pointing (pointedly), marching up and down in a sort of frenzy – and all he’s done is to beat Raonic, a rather overated player who is anyway out of form, in a second round match.

I remember this Sisjling getting overexcited when playing Tsonga at Queens. Strange character.


jane Says:

Well, thus far the draw on this side has gone to form/seed, with Berd, Delpo, Tomic, Nishikori, F-Lo, Gasquet, Anderson, Seppi and Dodig through and Dolgo winning. Only Raonic is upset so far, with Dimitrov hanging in the balance. Maybe this break will help him? Meanwhile Struff took a set from Chardy, so that might be an upset in the making – or at least a delayed affair.


grendel Says:

Trust the rain to arrive just as Laura Robson is due to play. As Colin pointed out the other day, Laura often has difficulties with players much lower ranked than herself. Hope she can give a good account of herself today. There’s a lot of very good youngsters coming good in the women’s game.


grendel Says:

Today’s tennis has been a holding operation. The fun resumes tomorrow.


jane Says:

Under the dome with Radwanska/Johansson. The sound is so echoey in there.


Polo Says:

Can you imagine if Sharapova and de Brito played under the dome yesterday?


Thomas Says:

The noise would have been louder than a concert.


the DA Says:

So Gasquet plays Tomic next. That should be…interesting. It’s Nole time now, right?


Polo Says:

I should remember to take an antacid before watching Gasquet’s next match.


jane Says:

DA, I am thinking Tomic could win that one. And if he gets on a roll here, he could be dangerous. Didn’t he reach the quarterfinals? Maybe 2011? i know he played Nole and it was a nail-biter.

Also Berdych/Anderson, Delpo/(maybe)Dimitrov – those could be interesting matches, and possibly F-Lo/Haas could be good as well.


RZ Says:

Grendel, I certainly hope Laura can make it through her next match. I’d think the crowd would help her.


SG1 Says:

“Ben Pronin Says:
Well let’s just clarify that Federer/Nadal is not a single level. There’s Nadal’s level, then there’s a few levels up where Federer resides.”

LOL. Never have two players been closer. Yes, Fed has the slam count. He also has a three head start on Rafa. Regardless of the slam count, Rafa owned (yes…I say owned) Federer in Federer`s prime. He`s beaten Roger on hard courts grass and obviously clay. “A few levels up” is not based on anything factual I can see.


SG1 Says:

Perhaps he’s a level up, if levels are measured in millimetres.


SG1 Says:

Raonic gone huh? I don’t think Ljubicic is really the answer for him. This guy needs to get more mobile, more light footed out there. Maybe a guy like Patrick Rafter would be a better fit as coach. I was thinking Raonic would get to the 2nd week. He will need to re-evaluate his approach to tennis if he wants to move to the next level. The aggressive players are doing well at this Wimbledon. He should be right in there.

I agree with Jane. His return is a little suspect. Not a big fan of his backhand either. I have a feeling that these two things are affected by his movement. If he moved better he’d look better returning and hitting backhands.


the DA Says:

@ Jane – yes I think Bernie could certainly win. And yes, it was 2011 when he took out Soderling and perplexed Nole for a good set and a half. He’s beefed up his FH since then also.

I can’t believe Berdy is due to meet Anderson again. Haven’t they met 4 times already? F-Lo vs Haas would definitely be interesting. Funny I haven’t seen one Haas match yet – has he been sent out to the boondocks?


Polo Says:

If you are not a good mover, that would be more evident on a grass surface. Raonic, if his movement does not improve, will have a hard time doing well at Wimbledon.


jane Says:

Reynolds has some pop on that serve!


jane Says:

DA, not sure: haven’t seen Haas yet either, but he’s played only one match. ;) He’s supposed to play Jimmy Wang today (after Dimitrov’s match) but with this rain… sigh.


Ben Pronin Says:

I’m actually really enjoying this match. Reynolds trying to slug it out with Djokovic on the baseline. Doing good so far. But also giving Djokovic a chance to show off just how ridiculous he is off the baseline. It’s really amazing how the game has evolved.


Ben Pronin Says:

Uh oh. If Djokovic loses today it’ll be up to Murray to lose in the 4th round to complete the sequence.


Ben Pronin Says:

As clean as it gets in a tiebreaker for Djokovic.

Not sure how much more of this Reynolds can keep up. He seems to be pushing himself as hard as possible but Djokovic is doing just enough to keep his nose in front.


jane Says:

They’ve announced that all the doubles matches scheduled for today have been canceled. I wonder what they will do with CC when this match is over. Will they put Laura Robson on it, or allow Dimitrov to finish, or put Ferrer on – all of the above? Hard to say.


Tennis Vagabond Says:

Sadly, there are no giants in the current crop of youngsters. I had high hopes for Milos, but he has never even repeated his breakout form from Oz two years ago, let alone risen above it.
Nishikori, Tomic, Dmitrov, I really don’t see any of these guys becoming superstars.
Janowicz, maybe.
We may actually see Djokovic and Murray rule the sport as long as Federer simply because there is no one rising to challenge them from the youth wing. Berdych and Tsonga are both older. Del Potro should have ample opportunity, as Rafa and Fed age, he will have just Djoker and Murray in his way.


jane Says:

Play is done for the day. The have announced no more matches will be moved to CC today. I wonder why? Perhaps to preserve the grass?

That’s a shame.

Looks like rain is forecast for tomorrow, as well, but it should be clear Saturday.


Ben Pronin Says:

Good thing they can catch up on their matches on Sunday!


Polo Says:

I agree with Tennis Vagabond. None of those younger crop of players seem capable. You can tell with Federer, Nadal, Djokovic that they will be great because they keep improving each year in leaps and bounds. These new crop of players don’t show that. They are very stagnant. Djokovic seems determined to get up to the level of Federer and Nadal.


jane Says:

Are you being ironic Ben?


jane Says:

^ they don’t play the first Sunday or has that changed?

Tennis Vagabond, are Fedal done, though? Doubt it, myself. Certainly not Rafa, unless the knee(s) really take a turn for the worse, and Fed will keep playing for a while longer methinks. He played a great match yesterday; it was very close. If he were to slide out of the top ten he might reassess. J-Mac was talking about that a few minutes ago, wondering how Fed would react were he really to start losing his footing in the race.


the DA Says:

They never play Sunday. It’s amazing how often they’ve still managed to complete the tourney within 13 days. (take note: USO)

Bernie is was bold in his presser:

“​A lot of people were happy when Nadal lost.I think Roger was very happy.I think he got ahead of himself,then things turned around”.


jane Says:

Leave it to Bernie. LOL.

Glad Nole stepped up his play, although Reynolds clearly tired too. But I thought he played a good match versus Nole with some great serving – smart placement.


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Rafa hasnt won a GS off clay since 2010,Roger has only won one GS since 2010,i dont know if both are going into a decline,but i think its safe to say,that they are not the dominant duo anymore,however both are still putting themselves in contention,and as long as they do that,and they are still hungry,then they will always have their chances,and i suppose when you are as great as they are,and achieved what they have,as they are such great champions,i think to write them off would be at your peril IMO.


jane Says:

Nole said the indoor conditions were actually slower, that it took a while to adjust.


grendel Says:

Anderson/Berdych – primeval slugfest short on entertainment value. Things would have to be pretty grim before you chose to spend time watching them.

Janowicz has all the makings of a great player. He is easily the most mobile of the giants, has a serve maybe as potent as Isner’s, has good touch as well as a kind of raw power you don’t often see. And he has desire, which will sometimes take him over the edge (he probably cheated in that match with Gasquet, who was too much of a gentleman to make much fuss – he lost the match, though, a tight one). Tomic, as ever, is the joker in the pack. There seems to be a depth to his talent which may or may not be plumbed.

Llodra, after withdrawing yesterday from the singles, drew back in again today for a spot of doubles. However his opponents, catching on to the spirit of the thing, withdrew themselves.

Yes, the camera focused in on the Sharp a few times, demurely clapping, leaning forward to urge her man on with ladylike restraint. Here is a woman who is cannily aware of lurking cameras. Oddly, Dimitrov had a fall remarkably similar to her own, which entailed doing the splits. He didn’t complain.


RZ Says:

Humble Rafa – LOL. In that pic Roger looks like he just bit a lemon.


RZ Says:

the DA, yes, it seems like Berdych and Anderson play each other a lot. I think Berdych has won each time, which is surprising since Anderson is no pushover, and I’d think he’d have the game to trouble Berdych. Will this be the time he pulls it off?

I’m pulling for Haas to do well here. A good week could see him into the top 10, and he got some help with Wawrinka losing in the first round.


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

It was a tight 1st set,Nole didnt take those break points,but when Nole got the break in that 2nd set,he seemed like he was playing more freely,a good solid win in the end.


jane Says:

Alison, since 2010?

Rafa played 4 slams in 2011 and reached the finals of 3 of those, winning one.
In 2012, he played only 2 slams and reached the finals of both winning one.
In 2013, thus far, he has played 2 slams, winning one.
So out of 11 possible slams (4 2011; 4 2012; 3 so far 2013), he’s played in 8 of those slams and he’s won 3 of those 8 slams, but he’s reached the finals of 6 of those 8.

With this in mind, I don’t think you can lump Fed and Rafa together in terms of their slam results.

Fed’s results in the slams have been different insofar as he is not going as deep in slams anymore.

Since 2010?
2011, Fed was in semis, finals, quarters, semis
2012 Fed was in semis, semis, win, quarters
2013 Fed was in semis, quarter, round 2

Thus, while Rafa has contested in the finals of 6 of the 8 slams he’s played in the last 2.5 years, Fed has contested in 2 of the 11 slams he’s played in the last 2.5. years.

Fed’s decline is marked.

Rafa isn’t in decline. He’s just had time out for injury.

They are two separate cases methinks. Rafa is still right in there – when he’s in there. Fed is less consistent (even though he still goes deep and can thus channel some magic/spring a surprise).


jane Says:

Oops sorry Alison – of course Rafa played Wimbledon too in 2012, so the numbers are slightly off.


jane Says:

oops sorry again Hippy Chic! (I keep thinking of you as alison still, apologies.)


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Yeah thats what i said,they still put themselves in contention,but not dominating the way that they used to do,which is to be expected,i see what your saying though Jane.


grendel Says:

“Rafa isn’t in decline. He’s just had time out for injury”

But these aren’t in opposition. As he gets older, the injuries become more debilitating. That is a symptom of decline. Naturally, this decline is different in kind to Federer’s on account of age difference. When Nadal can get it together, he remains the potent force he has always been, certainly on clay. Must be some doubt about grass now. Remains to be seen about hard court. But it would be surprising if the injuries did not become more noticeable, more destructive, and therefore having the effect of hastening decline.

Another thing – Rafa’s decline is more recent than Federer’s, so those figures are misleading.


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Jane i dont mind been called Alison if you wish honestly :)..


jane Says:

Yes, Hippy Chic, my point was simply that Rafa has contested 6 of 9 slam finals compared to 2 of 11 slam finals for Fed. That’s 67% versus 18% in terms of being in contention for the title. But yeah, Rafa’s won 3 in the last to years (of 9) and Fed’s won 1 (of 11) so you’re right to point out that they aren’t dominating slams the same way they used to do.


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Grendel Roger plays a lighter shedual these days,do you think that Rafa should do the same,been as these days the injuries seem to be more difficult to bounce back from,just wondering what your take is?


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Jane thanks i never thought of it that way.


jane Says:

grendel, yes perhaps. I don’t know yet with Rafa. It’s harder to tell. I mean if he has reached 6 of the last 9 slam finals he’s been in, and in still in contention for number 1, it’s hard to say. He came back and reached 9 straight finals. He still seems like a more – as you say – “potent” threat. But the jury is still out. We’ll know more, perhaps, by this time next year. But he is 5 years younger than Roger, albeit he plays a different style and turned pro very young so that will have taken its toll.

I just wouldn’t count either guy out, and especially not a healthy Rafa still. It’ll definitely be interesting to see what effect the hard court season has.


jane Says:

@ 3:19 I meant “two years” not “to years”!


jane Says:

Hippy chic, agree with you in this: “i think to write them off would be at your peril”.


jane Says:

” if he has reached 6 of the last 9 slam finals he’s been in”

Should read “if he has reach 6 finals in the last 9 slams he’s been in”


grendel Says:

Well,x hippy chic, I think Rafa already does play a lighter schedule. Or perhaps you mean: drop one of the claycourts, like Barcelona? He might be advised to do that and swap it for Halle – if he is serious about tackling Wimbledon again.

But in general, a player like Nadal who has long term injury problems which may be contained but can never be resolved – this is really quite a deep problem, isn’t it. Presumably the Nadal camp take medical advice. Who are we to offer an opinion there?


Nina Says:

Very solid match form Nole, glad he didn’t catch the Big Four flu. He is playing freely, with little errors, clean shots, excellent serve, great return… though grass equalizes most players, still today Nole’s victory was never in doubt.


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Thanks Grendel ever the voice of reasoning lol,i do agree i dont see the point in playing Barcelona,and i think he should miss Rome or perhaps Madrid,and play Halle instead to peak for Wimbledon.


Wog boy Says:

I was worried for Nole since he was playing #100 plus player and those players are doing wonders this year at Wimbledon.

BTW, when you come out of closet as a hater, as Contador outed one formerly nice poster, you cannot hide anymore. I enjoyed that “intelligent” post about No1e and not achieving anything until after 24 years of age.
BOTTOM LINE, keep them coming, I am sure the other posters likes them too, but keep in your mind that hate messed up your brain. I love TX:)


grendel Says:

“He came back and reached 9 straight finals.” yes, but jane, these were all clay except Indian Wells, which some people regard, half seriously, as honorary clay.

Nobody has suggested Nadal is in decline in clay – although you might possibly detect a slight writing on the wall. Monte Carlo – gone. RG – Djokovic choked and should have won. These are tiny straws which may not be significant, but who knows.

But off clay – that’s the point…..We’ve had an unequivocal answer w.r.t grass. Although Nadal may do well on the American circuit, I would be very surprised if he won the US Open. We’ll see.


Bada Bing Says:

How does the schedule look for Novak?
He plays next on Saturday then Monday, right?


Ben Pronin Says:

Grendel, I agree with everything you’re saying, almost.

It’s almost too easy to conclude Nadal is in decline outside of clay and all the stuff. But we have so little to draw from it’s almost hilarious. He’s played 5 hard court tournaments in the last 2 years. 5!! And his results have been 3 semis, 1 final, and 1 win. Not exactly poor results. And 3 grass court tournaments in the at time, horrible results. 3rd round, 2nd round, first round. That 3rd round was a bye, so he’s 2-3 in the last 2 years on grass. I don’t know how much we’re supposed to draw from this.

Has Nadal started a decline on clay? I’m going to say yes. He was pushed in a lot of matches this year, something that’s rarely happened in the past. It hasn’t made a big difference in his overall results, but at least now we know he won’t dominate forever.


El Flaco Says:

Some players who otherwise would probably never be on center court at Wimbledon will get the experience because Federer and Nadal are no longer in the tournament.


El Flaco Says:

Some players who otherwise would probably never be on center court at Wimbledon will get the experience because Federer and Nadal are no longer in the tournament.


jane Says:

Ben, “He’s played 5 hard court tournaments in the last 2 years”

Do you mean 2012 and 2013 so far, because if you’re including 2013, there are still a lot of hard court events to be played.


Nina Says:

Ben Pronin said: “Has Nadal started a decline on clay? I’m going to say yes. He was pushed in a lot of matches this year, something that’s rarely happened in the past.”

I beg to differ Ben. He was pushed in the first rounds but he usually does until he reaches the second week of a slam. Maybe more so this time, but it was old Nadal from quarters to final. And who besides Nole can challenge him on clay? I wouldnt say he’s declined, he just won his 8th RG, how can we conclude that? But i’d rather say Nole is getting closer by the minute. It’s not Rafa declining, but rather Novak stepping it up and believing in himself against Rafa.


RZ Says:

El Flaco, I noticed that with tomorrow’s draw sheet. A lot of players who normally wouldn’t be on Centre, Court 1, or Court 2 are assigned there because those courts aren’t taken up by Roger, Rafa, Sharapova, or even Tsonga (Murray of course will be on one of those courts). Nice for them to get an opportunity.


grendel Says:

Ben

That is a very good point about Nadal being pushed more in the clay tournaments. That was very noticeable this year. I mean, I recall Nadal just flying through the rounds before – those days may be gone.

An interesting excerpt from Gulbis’ interview:

” when I played against Roger Vasselin, I played three sets, and you need to be completely concentrated every point for three hours.
After that you have incredible headache, you’re completely exhausted, and you need this one day to recover. But if you play like this and you play far in the tournaments, as Victoria Azarenka does, as Rafa Nadal does, as somebody else does, it’s tough to recover.
You need time to recover. Mentally, physically, every time. You need more time in between.”

I thought these interviews were mandatory? I was keen to see what Kirilenko had to say about her defeat by Robson. No interview. You have to suspect a deep dose of sour grapes – and that tells you something about Kirilenko, I’m personally getting rather tired of having her pretty little china doll face rammed into every mention of her.


Giles Says:

“but at least now we know he won’t dominate forever” That is the dumbest statement. Nothing is forever, nothing or no one!!


grendel Says:

@RZ

Well, if jane is right about rain for tomorrow, I feel very lucky. On Centre Court, 1st up, Laura Robson, then Janowicz/Almagro, and finally Murray/Robredo.

Absolutely guaranteed. Not bad, eh? I have heard that they are going to put a roof on #1 court, too. Is this true?


jane Says:

^ Are you going, grendel, tomorrow? If so, lucky you.

Not sure about Nadal declining on clay, especially at Roland Garros; even last year he didn’t drop one set until the final, where he lost only the one, and he handed out several bagels and breadsticks. 2011 the only real scare was Isner, who was in the zone in round 1 and took 2 sets, otherwise only Fed got a set in the final. This year he lost 4 sets in the entire event, 2 of those to Nole. So, he’s still rather dominant on clay methinks. If he is winning the FO still and losing only 2,3,4, sets the whole event, then he is still the king (it’s not that much different than 2005-2006 when he also lost 3 sets the whole event).


thark Says:

I find it strange that people treat injuries as a separate category from fitness. When a player loses a match because they are cramping and exhausted and can’t keep up the rallies, people treat this as a point to criticize, rather than an excuse. They point out that the player should work on their fitness and if they ever expect to win at the highest level they need to improve this aspect of their game. This lack of fitness is certainly not treated as something that is out of the player’s control – something that the tennis gods rained down from above and the player must now suffer despite their inherent greatness.

But when a player has certain types of problems with their fitness, such as difficulty with a joint like the knee, this is immediately labeled as an “injury” and presumed to be outside the player’s control. All of a sudden this loss is unique and somehow excused or asterisked because it resulted from an “injury.”

There is no separation between different types of fitness. Players who don’t have knee problems are often in that situation because they have taken great pains to train strength and flexibility around those joints, because they have managed their schedule, because they have managed their training appropriately, because they have considered their health when devising their playing style.

If a player runs hills to increase their aerobic capacity and doesn’t collapse during rallies we complement them on their “fitness.” If a player strengthens and conditions their knees to keep them functioning at a high level even under duress, we take it for granted – and when another player’s knees (ankle, shoulder) give out we assume they have no responsibility for the problem.

Many players on the tour pay great attention to all aspects of their health: eating, sleeping, work vs. rest, tennis vs. other types of physical and mental conditioning. Excusing player X’s loss to player Y based on an arbitrary designation of “injury” is an insult to the effort of player Y to stay “injury” free.

Not every aspect of competition happens on the court.


Brando Says:

LOL, non- Rafa fans worried about Rafa’s future? Priceless!


Kimberly Says:

Djokovic choked and should have won. These are tiny straws which may not be significant, but who knows
____________________
This is nonsense, you can also say Nadal choked and should have won in 4. The right player won the match.


Nina Says:

I agree with you Thark, but Nadal’s knee problem is caused by foot condition from birth, not due to bad fitness. But I agree he WASN’T injured, pain doesn’t equal injury and most players play with pain anyway.


Okiegal Says:

The people on this forum don’t have a clue about Rafa’s physical problems. I think everyone should stop commenting about what they surmise.
These statements about Rafa’s health are purely conjecture. No one really knows except Rafa and his team. Let us, as his fans hope for a quick recovery.

Vamos, Rafa!!


Brando Says:

FO SF: rafa led the match the entire time from the off except 0-2 in the 5th- 1 mere break down early in a set. He outplayed Novak in virtually all departments according to match stats- check them! He was serving for the damn match in set 4! What did Rafa say about why he lost set 4, simple: 1- he said serving into the wind was trciky for both so he knew closing it out won’t be easy- seems fair to say,2- he knew Novak would go for it as he has nothing to lose- seems fair again, 3- he said he missed a very makeable FH at 30-15 which he should have made- again seems fair to say, 4- Novak winning the TB was normal he thought as momentum was with him then- seems fair to say, especially when one considers AO 12′ final. Did Novak have a chance to win? Of course, just like Rafa in AO 12′. But he blew it! Sam Smith said it best IMO: Novak seemed to lack self belief on the court, as if he doubted whether he could REALLY beat Rafa at RG, and then the way Rafa stormed back and took the match when it was there (from 0-2 in the 5th, Rafa won 9 games in comparison to 5 by Novak) would only be disheartening for Novak since: how often is he really going to get such a chance v guy who ONLY has 1 loss in 9 years there and is 5-0 v Novak at RG? Long story short: as Novak said himself- that 5th set showed Rafa’s mental and physical strength, above all else: his courage to go for his shots when it was on the line. Rafa’s called the king of clay for a reason: he showed it in that 5th set v his biggest supposed rival!


andrea Says:

raonic….what the heck has happened to you?

sad to not have two dynamic players (rog and rafa) still in wimbledon. loses a bit of lustre.


Brando Says:

@Andrea: completely agree. Those 2 create an excitement, an interest level that the rest just simply do not come close too.


jane Says:

thark, interesting points re: the distinction between fitness and injury. I am sure there are probably injuries that could be avoided – one wonders if la Monf didn’t bring at least one or two on himself over the years! But I do think genetics comes into play in some of this, not to mention build. Some players just are more flexible; some players just are stockier; some players are very tall and perhaps put more stress and strain on their joints as a result. Also, someone like Andy Murray was born with a split patella so he has to be very careful about his knees – luckily he’s managed that extremely well. Some players have other conditions too. Some are more manageable than others. But your point about blaming “fitness”/lack thereof and “excusing” injuries is interesting and certainly something it seems a lot of people tend to do.


jane Says:

andrea, it was sad as he was quite flat. But his opponent played a smart match, moving him around, taking advantage of second serves, coming to net very effectively, and also serving pretty darn well himself. Milos needs a better return. :( Not sure if you watched. Anyhow, at least Bouchard’s still in it – for now. But she doesn’t have an easy match vs. Navarro next and even if she makes it through that, she’ll likely face Kvitova.


grendel Says:

jane

Ben – and I following him – was not referring to RG, but to the clay tourneys preceding it. There is no doubt that there is a change here from previous years – maybe not massive, but an interesting marker. er, no, not going to Wimbledon – just telly.

Kimberley – you can “nonsense” as much as you want, but it is a matter of opinion, or in your case, tribalism. b.t.w. I’ve also heard from some that Djokovic should have won first set. There will always be arguments about this sort of thing. You’ll only get certitude, not certainty, which is not the same thing.

Thark
That was a very interesting post, though I’m not sure who it was directed to. I wasn’t using the idea of “injury” as excuse but as a pointer to decline. There is something to add to what you said, and that is that some players suffer from congenital problems of certain sorts. I was given to understand that Nadal fell into this category, but whether he does or doesn’t, quite obviously some do. Tsonga I would guess. That is not to make excuses for them, simply to relay the facts. Heather Watson is currently recovering (we hope) from glandular fever (not that this is congenital), and she is currently only playing at perhaps 70-80% of her capacity. That’s just a fact.


jane Says:

Here’s Tignor’s assessment of the “Day After”

http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2013/06/after-deluge/48125/#.Ucy3h5hQ0VQ


thark Says:

It’s funny, grendel, I can honestly say it was not directed at anyone in particular.

There is a large continuum of fitness and aptitude. Mononucleosis is less under a player’s control than muscle cramping. At the same time, it is interesting how we draw arbitrary lines in the sand.

David Ferrer is 5’9″ and Rafael Nadal is 6’1″. This difference is also “congenital,” no? Some players are born into wealthy families who can groom them for success in sports from the day of their first breath. All of these are facts, certainly. They offer advantages and disadvantages. But in sport we have made an agreement at the outset to judge success by the scoreline. This is also arbitrary, but it is the system we have agreed upon beforehand, so bringing many other things into the discussion after the match is in some sense a betrayal of that agreement. If a player withdraws before a match they are not signing such a compact, but once the first ball is struck we are bound by certain terms. All I’m suggesting is that we give credit to the winner, whoever they might be, under whatever circumstances they might have won. The fact that our expectations weren’t fulfilled is no reason to diminish someone’s accomplishments.


Anna Says:

All injuries are not equal. Cramping is not considered an injury and that’s why little if any treatment is allowed on the tennis court. It’s also thought that cramping and conditioning are related and therefore within the control of the athlete. Joint/ligament damage is not dependant on fitness. Nadal could train until the cows comes home and it’s not going to improve his knees. The kind of damage that Nadal has comes from overuse. DelPotro’s wrist damage probably stemmed from trauma and overuse. Because no two people are alike it’s impossible to predict exactly what therapies, schedules, etc. are right for each athlete. At best a player can guesstimate how to best train and schedule and hope that it works right the first time. Nothing is black and white when it comes to people. I do agree though, that if a player walks onto the court to play a match, all discussion of injuries should be verbotten. Some posters would have you believe that nadal uses his injury as an excuse when he loses matches. I don’t see it that way. In fact as he has gotten older and wiser he’s been aggressive about not talking about his injury after matches. The press continues to be relentless in their pursuit of this storyline.


jane Says:

Does anyone think these upsets might actually spur on some of players to do well, or better, to push themselves further? It seems like it could be inspiring and maybe even restore belief in more players in the field, which could arguably be a good thing for the sport. It seems like that could be the case, but I guess we will have to wait and see how it pans out. It could mean more upsets, or not. I don’t know. But it’s just a new dynamic is all.


TennisZod Says:

I hope for more upsets except for Nole. Nole deserve this for being best player since more than 2 years. He best. Andy Murray, Del Potro, Berdych and any other threat get upset in next match I hope.


skeezer Says:

RG Nole/RN

That right player won, its in the books. But there is a story very different brewing from other RG finals. How long has it been since Rafa was pushed to a 5th set in the finals @RG? How very close was Nole from winning that match. Face it, it was a “winnable’ match by Nole. A telling threat to the future for all Rafa’s opponents in the future. PLayers can now see he is not invincible, but you must play aggressive.

I will predict this, Rafa’s ‘ownership” on RG is gone. He may still win more RG, but not as easy as in the past, and players do take note when they see a weakness. The word does spread. Look at Wimby. Players see that the top players can be beat. The intimidation factor by just being a top players is going bye bye. Welcome to the new era..its coming.


metan Says:

@skeezer.

Hehehehe. Everyone have their own share. That’s including your man.

Do you need more tissues I do have extra.eekkk!


TennisZod Says:

Fed fans and Rafa fans have go at each other? Hehe your heroes in same boat. 100+ rank players beat them easy :D
Nole rule. Bow to Nole dominance.


Okiegal Says:

I thought the nasty remark Novak made to the crowd at FO was classless. I’m off of him like a dirty shirt. I actually thought he was a nicer person than that. His Mom said once in an interview……”Everyone says Roger Rafa Roger Rafa…….now everyone says Nole, Nole, Nole…..but that isn’t really the case. The conversations about tennis still revolve around Rafa and Roger, thank goodness!!!

Vamos Rafa!!!! Come back stronger.


courbon Says:

Hey Zod-why don’t you zod-off?


TennisZod Says:

I say truth. Fed old now Nadal outside clay no threat. Men tennis kneel before No1e.


skeezer Says:

@metan

So what are you really trying to say? I do not get your post in connection with mine…..


skeezer Says:

@courban

Fabulous post. This guy/gal/it (HR,RFF,TZ) is starved for attention since he couldn’t cut it with his pet rats at the local comedy club. Have you seen those rats by the way, please let him know, he is lost without them.


Okiegal Says:

@Courbon 12:37 am

My feelings exactly. So annoying!!!!!


metan Says:

@ Skeezer.

I am saying is Roger has 17. Rafa has 12. Nole has 6. Andy has 1 at this very moment but those number still can be changed in the future.

But next time our guy got bitten I will give you extra tissue incase yours not enough or may be you can buy by yourself. Hehehe. Who is hurt the most needed extra tissue no.


metan Says:

@skeezer. Forget something to say. You are super funny man. Sometimes optimistic othertimes pessimistic. You’d better have enough rest no. Don’t worry about Rafa millions take care but like your comment.


TennisZod Says:

Fed fans and Nadal fans pass tissue each other. Nole fans smile see Nole take Wimbledon.

@skeezer, your cats lost again?


metan Says:

@skeezer.

What makes top player different with the rest is their consistency. Like those who beat RF and RN are you sure they will win wimby. Look @ del potro case he has one slam only after trying so many years.
May be factor X also have a role. Do you think Nole can carry on his moment until next year. I think now is Andy moments even for next RG. Any other thoughts?


nadalista Says:

skeezer Says:

RG Nole/RN

That right player won, its in the books. But there is a story very different brewing from other RG finals. How long has it been since Rafa was pushed to a 5th set in the finals @RG? How very close was Nole from winning that match. Face it, it was a “winnable’ match by Nole. A telling threat to the future for all Rafa’s opponents in the future. PLayers can now see he is not invincible, but you must play aggressive.

I will predict this, Rafa’s ‘ownership” on RG is gone. He may still win more RG, but not as easy as in the past, and players do take note when they see a weakness. The word does spread. Look at Wimby. Players see that the top players can be beat. The intimidation factor by just being a top players is going bye bye. Welcome to the new era..its coming.

June 27th, 2013 at 11:31 pm

………………………………………..

It follows, this is what @skeezer must have/would have said after Novak’s 5-set win over Rafa at the Australian Open 2012:

Oz Open 2012 Nole/RN

That right player won, its in the books. But there is a story very different brewing from other Oz Open finals. How long has it been since Novak was pushed to a 5th set in the finals @Oz Open? How very close was Rafa from winning that match. Face it, it was a “winnable’ match by Rafa. A telling threat to the future for all Novak’s opponents in the future. PLayers can now see he is not invincible, but you must play aggressive.

I will predict this, Novak’s ‘ownership” on Rod Laver Arena is gone. He may still win more Norman Brooks Challenge Cups, but not as easy as in the past, and players do take note when they see a weakness. The word does spread. Look at Wimby. Players see that the top players can be beat. The intimidation factor by just being a top players is going bye bye. Welcome to the new era..its coming.

……………………………………….

And he would be right in both instances, no?


grendel Says:

thark

your post raises very deep issues. It’s like under law – when is a crime mitigated by personal circumstances? Different legal systems differ; the Italians, characteristically, make much of “passion” when murder of a certain sort is committed, and so on. If you probe and probe, you end up with atoms and molecules. So a line has to be drawn, even though it cannot be conclusive.

In the end, injuries (whether congenital or acquired) are just too bad. Agreed. I wasn’t myself (initially) getting involved in the argument as to whether or not Nadal is in some sense responsible for his injuries. Only: are they getting more unmanageable and, if they are, then this can be taken to be a symptom of decline.

skeezer

“That right player won, its in the books”. This carries on Thark’s argument, and we can agree. But people, understandably, are rarely consistent on this issue. When Djokovic beat Nadal at Miami and Indian Wells 2011, Kimberley was keen to say that there was nothing in it. Gulbis , after being beaten in Rome by Nadal (1-6,7-5,6-4), apparently said that, on the strength of his performance, he was the better player overall. Nadal was reported to have disagreed. The convention is, the best player is the one who wins the last point.

But that does not rule out interpretation. That is legitimate, because it gives you an idea where a particular player is w.r.t the rest of the field – which is what you were, quite reasonably, doing, skeezer.


Giles Says:

@nadalista. It would appear that some posters are still smarting from Rafa’s RG win, no?


Tennis x hippy chic Says:

Stan Wawa pushed Novak very close at the AO,likewise Fernando against Rafa in 2009 in that semi,the very lines between success and failure in a match are such small margins sometimes,a few or even one or two points can determine which way a match goes,but when alls said and done,the winner wins and the loser loses,and thats all that counts really,its almost as if fans seek some comfort in the knowledge and try to convince themselves sometimes,unlucky in this match,not 100% in that match blah blah blah.


grendel Says:

@jane 10.20

“It could mean more upsets”. I wouldn’t draw that conclusion myself. What you have is a curious mini-tournament to see who will join Murray or Gulbis/Verdasco in the semi. One of Kubot, Paire, Brown, Melzer, Almagro, Stakohvsky, Janowicz, Mannarino.

That certainly makes for interest and, I agree with jane,could in the long run “restore belief in more players in the field”.

w.r.t.upsets, Djokovic is moving serenely through – don’t see any upsets there. And even in the unlikely event that Berdych were to beat him, that was always a small possibility anyway. I can’t really see a player with as solid a reputation as Berdych being affected by the late shenanigans. Also, if Janowicz emerges from the mini-group and defeats Murray, that was always slightly on the cards. Janowicz seems to be in his own bubble, almost oblivious as to what is going on elsewhere. On the other hand, if somebody else – Paire, say – were to do that, then I think jane’s suggestion might hold.


Ben Pronin Says:

Nadal has only struggled in early rounds at Wimbledon, not at the French. Losing sets in his first 2 matches is not normal for him at all.

Nadalista, you’re a year too late. Novak won another one.


Brando Says:

@Courbon: spot on re Zod!


Brando Says:

Re FO: it’s normal for others to seek hope or clutch onto any glimmer of it seeing as such is Rafa’s dominance there, but the fact is:Rafa won. Again. And this time too after returning from a 7 month lay off, and even losing at MC. Time will tell what the future holds, for now let’s stick to 2013, and specifically Wimby.


skeezer Says:

Nadalista,

Maybe. Maybe not. I am talking about who was the better player that day. They won the match. It is proven and how the game works. You can, lets say, have more winners and spectacular ahots and still lose. You may look like the better player, but the game doesn’t reward you for playing well or better. It rewards you for winning the match. Ask Brad Giobert, he was well known for “winning ugly”.

Regarding the “bigger story”. Nole overall imo is still getting better. Rafa is not. Rafa is waaay better than anyone on Clay, and Nole is showing all its not that wsy anymore. Nole has never dominated HC the way Rafa has on Clay.

—-

Courban,

Gotcha ;)


skeezer Says:

^sorry for the typos, I need a grendel typing skills class.


madmax Says:

Federer, (he won 161 points to Stakhovsky’s 162), thats how close it was. Incredible.


Danny Morris Says:

“I find it strange that people treat injuries as a separate category from fitness. When a player loses a match because they are cramping and exhausted and can’t keep up the rallies, people treat this as a point to criticize, rather than an excuse. They point out that the player should work on their fitness and if they ever expect to win at the highest level they need to improve this aspect of their game. This lack of fitness is certainly not treated as something that is out of the player’s control – something that the tennis gods rained down from above and the player must now suffer despite their inherent greatness.”

Very well said Thark. Most of the fans who express such double standards are people who are new to the sport and do not tennis and its history. The aussies or Sampras or any of the legends – lendl, borg – they never saw injuries as separate fitness. As harsh as it sounds, if you keep going down the treacherous path of making excuses for often injured players you will end up with something contradictory like “Esther Vergeer -God Bless her, is the greatest tennis player, because inspite of being in a wheel chair, she never lost a match in 10years”.

That is an extreme argument, but you get the point. I have always had arguments with this new-age tennis fans, even Nole fans who justify his poor fitness in his early years. Thankfully, Novak himself was not in denial and he has rectified that flaw and not to the surprise of anyone with a brain, he has been in Fedal league since then.

I think a lot of people who do not understand history, politics and economics should stay away from “analysis” of any non-technical nature. If they have not played tennis, and have not logged in enough hours of tennis viewing they should leave the technical tennis talk to those who actually have.

They should just stick to “chardy/murray or some clown” is looking hot or mean or whatever it is.


Danny Morris Says:

Long Live The King:

Great to see your posts. It is always great to see old Federer fans posting on this site.

Let us hope Federer can go back and dig again into the well of his Genius and pull another heist like he did in 2011-2012. Back then, I remember Dave and yourself kept saying how Federer’s end of season run in 2011 has given him a great shot at no.1 in the next year.

It remains one of the most astute comments I have seen from tennis fans and something none of the experts got wind of till federer slapped them in the face with that magical wand of his.

What do you make of this year so far? Can he repeat the magic for the 734525987359 time again?


Danny Morris Says:

It is obvious Nadal is in a decline. This is a statistic I picked up from another site.

Since october 2010 – 33 months, for those who are weak in math, Nadal has won 1 – I repeat 1 title in 33 months, outside clay – where 75% of the tennis tournaments occur.

That is a total giveaway, either by volition or force, he and his team are drifting to the clay-courts only schedule that has been foreseen by most experts who see rafa playing majority of his matches in his career, fetching and defending rather than attacking and finishing points like Federer/Novak do. It is no surpise that the 2 shot-makers in top 4 are relatively injury free [novak had fitness problems, but they were more ailment related than injury] and the 2 defenders nadal and murray are more injury prone and conveniently these injuries occur during their weakest surfaces. I mean, we know rafa hates anything outside clay and murray sucks on clay but atleast try to be subtle, guys. LOL!


Ben Pronin Says:

Thark, interesting points, but fitness isn’t that black and white. I don’t think fans take it for granted that a player strengthen their knee joints, the players themselves do. Everyone is structured differently and what hurts one guy might not hurt another.

Had Djokovic torn some ligaments in his ankle when he rolled it, he’d forever have a fragile ankle no matter how much he strengthened it moving forward. Is it his fault that he had an accident and it’ll forever stay with him?

Tendinitis is caused by overuse, wear and tear. But it doesn’t happen to everyone. Is it really due to lack of fitness? Federer wasn’t always the most fit player but his knees got by just fine. This can be controlled, though, but not pushing your knees past their natural limits.

But there are other problems. Personally, I have misaligned knees. I’m at the point where the only thing that will help me is surgery. It’s not my fault my knees grew weird. I manage my tendinitis, though. I do yoga, I don’t go overboard with the weight training, I do various physical therapy exercises to help my knees as much as I can. But at the end of the day, I can only do so much.


thark Says:

No argument with any of that, Ben.

What seems to be an issue is treating a player’s issues as somehow separate from the player. Federer is better when the roof is closed. If he starts a match under the roof and then they open it and he loses, people are very quick to say that he lost “because” they opened the roof. Maybe that was a factor or maybe not, but we get into mental gymnastics after the fact where people attempt to reduce the value of the opponent’s win because the roof was open. Neither player has any control over the roof, and both players are expected to cope with both conditions if necessary. The winner is still the winner, and they are just as much the winner as if the roof had never been moved.

For example, what ever happened to Nole’s breathing problems? There was endless discussion a couple years ago about his asthma, etc.? What happened was that he started winning, so now no one mentions it. Does he have asthma? He might, but the point is that no one talks about it now that he is playing well. In tennis everyone comes to the table with different baggage, and that baggage is part of the player, not a separate entity. Some of it is mental, some of it is physical, and MOST of it is both. We see time and time again how players become consumed by thoughts of their niggling injuries when they are playing poorly, but somehow seem to have forgotten they exist when they are on a roll.

When Darcis beat Rafa everyone was talking about Rafa’s knees. After the fact, Darcis withdrew with a shoulder injury and I heard nothing but crickets. The fact is that Darcis played Rafa with his shoulder bothering him, but no one mentions it because it’s not part of the script, because Darcis wasn’t expected to win. So the armchair critics sit down after the match and decide that Rafa’s knees are a real problem and Darcis shoulder is not a real problem because that’s the only way to keep our fragile mental construct in one piece.

Andy Murray pointed out that most professionals on the tour are only at 100% physically about 20% of the time. I imagine he is probably right.

A win is a win is a win.


Ben Pronin Says:

Thark, couldn’t agree more.


hawkeye Says:

Nope.

Nole’s breathing problems were largely corrected when he changed his diet which contributed to him going to No. 1. You don’t see him struggling with his breathing anymore. That is why nobody talks about it anymore.

As far as opening the roof during a match? Has that EVER happened??? Don’t think so.

Rafa in decline? Perhaps, but still good enough for No. 1 in the RTL. Not too bad, no?


jane Says:

thark “Some of it is mental, some of it is physical, and MOST of it is both. ”

I agree and I think adrenaline also plays a role here, kicking in when a player might need it (or might not need it!), almost like fight or flight. Not sure if you’re interested in this, but there is an revealing piece written earlier this year on just this combination of things in relation to Nole and how he discovered gluten was causing some of his problems: will append the link in case you’d like to read it.

http://gulfnews.com/sport/tennis/serbian-doctor-on-how-he-cured-ailing-djokovic-1.1156174


thark Says:

@hawkeye – point taken about the roof, but let’s not miss the forest for the trees. Closing the roof would be just as good an illustration.

The magnitude of change in Nole’s performance would be difficult to attribute to diet. Links between asthma and diet are hotly debated in the medical community but nothing as dramatic as Nole’s change has been suggested.


thark Says:

Thanks jane – I guess Cetojevic has made his position in the debate clear ;)


nadalista Says:

@thark says 1:11 pm says:

“The fact is that Darcis played Rafa with his shoulder bothering him, but no one mentions it because it’s not part of the script, because Darcis wasn’t expected to win.”

No, this is not fact, this your opinion. The following is fact, from Darcis himself:

“It happened against Rafa but I had no pain. After a few games I was feeling great,” he said.

“After the match, a few hours after, I started to feel so much pain.”

“During the match it was perfect and I had no pain at all. I don’t know how it came after that.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2013/jun/26/steve-darcis-withdraws-wimbledon

You are the one trying to re-write history to suit your own preferred script and agenda, sir.

Darcis’s shoulder did not bother him during the match, it bothered him AFTER the match.


thark Says:

nadalista – that may be true about Darcis, but I’m surprised you think I have an “agenda.”

What agenda might that be?


nadalista Says:

@thark, no, it is not “may be true”, it is true, please read Darcis’s statement again.

Why are you misrepresenting facts? What is your motivation?


Bada Bing Says:

There is something to be said about a gluten-free diet. It’s since been adopted by Lisicki and just recently by Mattek-Sands who said she is feeling wonderful now.


nadalista Says:

………just present the truth please, the truth. Not what you think is the truth.


nadalista Says:

My post of 2:36 pm is for @thark.


Ben Pronin Says:

Thark, don’t waste time responding to trolls who add nothing to the conversation.

Speaking of Djokovic, I have no idea if he has asthma or not. I believe that he does, but it can’t be too serious considering he’s an extremely successful professional athlete. I think when he starts having “breathing issues” it’s almost more mental than physical.

Remember in 2010 when he went the entire clay season with severe allergies? Whatever happened to them? And more interestingly, why didn’t have them before? I know allergies sometimes develop late but it seemed so sudden and then just disappeared. I know several people with allergies and sometimes they’re simply unbeatable. You’re just going to have an awful time.

Federer used to talk about how he always tried his best to win in straight sets because he didn’t think he could last 4 or 5 sets. Nowadays he always packs for 5 sets. But it really makes you wonder how much of that is physical and how much of it is mental.

I’m not enjoying this current era where the sport is dominated by older players and young guys can’t break through worth a lick. I rooted hard against Agassi when he was finishing up his career. I rooted against Moya and sometimes Henman. Even now, I lean a lot more towards Djokovic than Federer (this was not the case a few years ago). It’s cool that Haas is playing so well, and I love his game, but I don’t want to see him winning against younger players (basically anyone). I don’t root for Ferrer or Robredo. The list goes on.

Anyways, my point is, it makes a crap ton of sense that tennis has become an older sport. Athletes nowadays know how to train and maintain and improve their fitness. And the older guys, having the experience, know that they are capable of going 4, 5 sets. Whereas the younger guys might not know it, won’t believe it, and so they struggle. Not because they are physically unfit, but because they think they’re physically unfit. If you go in telling yourself you have to win in under 3 hours and fail to do so, you’re probably going to lose after the 3 hour mark, or at least feel extreme fatigue.


Ben Pronin Says:

Bada Bing, gluten-free diets have proven effective, for the most part, for people who actually have trouble with gluten. It’s become a little bit of a fad because not everyone needs to ditch gluten. But if you feel like you’re not at 100% for whatever reason, get some blood work done and you can better determine what may or may not be effective for your diet. (Not you specifically, I mean in general for anybody).


hawkeye Says:

thark, my point was more about that people don’t talk about Nole’s breathing problems, not because he is winning, but because he rarely, if ever, displays those problems any more.

That said, I think diet had a LOT to do with Nole’s turn around given that he was diagnosed with celiac disease. Once diagnosed, I’m sure he was able to train differently. Once he started to believe in himself, he was virtually unstoppable in 2011. So, I believe it began with physical improvement followed by mental strength.


Giles Says:

The gluten free diet together with the use of the EGG has transformed joker into a SUPERMAN!!! WOW!! Wish he would stop using the EGG as it is not in the spirit of the sport and adopt more conventional methods of recuperating! #Unfair


WTF Says:

Giles.. either everyone else should get their own EGG, or campaign for the ITF/ATP/WTA to ban the thing.

It’s not in the spirit of the sport, but the one to blame for him using it is the ATP/ITF, not Djokovic.


TennisZod Says:

Nothing wrong in using the EGG to become force of nature. Nole already great so EGG help him. You think EGG help Roger play better in old age? You think EGG help Rafa who bad outside clay? NO. Because they not so good no more. Andy Murray can have EGG but he never become like Nole. ATP/ITF know what they do. EGG not wrong substance.


Nadalista Says:

Poor @Ben Pronin, that’s all his type knows, bullying.

#Compensation


Anna Says:

yeah, Thark likes to spin a good yarn. He’s pretty good at it too.


Nadalista Says:

And guess who loves those yarns hehehe! Why let the facts get in the way of a good yarn?

#Pathetic

Top story: Coric Ends Nadal's Season In Basel, Federer Overwhelms Dimitrov; Ferrer v Murray In Valencia
  • Recent Comments
Rankings
ATP - Oct 20 WTA - Oct 20
1 Novak Djokovic1 Serena Williams
2 Roger Federer2 Maria Sharapova
3 Rafael Nadal3 Simona Halep
4 Stan Wawrinka4 Petra Kvitova
5 David Ferrer5 Na Li
6 Tomas Berdych6 Agnieszka Radwanska
7 Kei Nishikori7 Eugenie Bouchard
8 Marin Cilic8 Ana Ivanovic
9 Milos Raonic9 Caroline Wozniacki
10 Andy Murray10 Angelique Kerber
More: Tennis T-Shirts | Tennis Shop | Live Tennis Scores | Headlines

Copyright © 2003-2014 Tennis-X.com. All rights reserved.
This website is an independently operated source of news and information and is not affiliated with any professional organizations.