Novak Djokovic: Roger Federer Deserves The Support He Received From The US Open Crowd
by Staff | September 14th, 2015, 1:54 am
  • 85 Comments

Novak Djokovic not only had to beat Roger Federer, but also the crowd tonight in the US Open final. The 23,000 plus fans in attendance were virtually all rooting for Federer it seemed, even clapping after faults.

But Djokovic proved his resiliency and mental toughness and came through in the end beating Federer to win his second career US Open title and his 10th Grand Slam.

“There was a lot of support for Roger,” Djokovic said. “There was some for me. For sure, I tried to focus on the ones that were supporting me. But I can’t, you know, sit here and criticize the crowd. On the contrary, you know, I think it’s logical to expect that a great player and a champion like Roger has the majority of the support anywhere I play him. You know, I would say super majority of places around the world are going to give him that support.

“I accept the fact. You know, everybody has a choice to support a player that they want to support, and he absolutely deserves to have the support he does because of all the years and success that he had and the way he carries himself on and off the court. No question about it. Me, I’m there to earn the support, and hopefully in the future I can be in that position.”

With the rain delaying the start of the match, the final became a nighttime event, the latest start in tournament history, adding to the electricity and the emotion and the fact many fans had little else to do during the rain delay but to drink more!

“New York is about night session. You know, music, entertainment, crowd interaction,” Djokovic said. “It’s part of the show. It’s part of what we do, and that’s why this tournament is so special. You come here knowing that this is going to — you know, this is what is waiting for you. And plus, if you’re playing Roger who is a crowd favorite anywhere he goes, especially here, it’s a reality you have to face.”


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85 Comments for Novak Djokovic: Roger Federer Deserves The Support He Received From The US Open Crowd

Ahfi Says:

This happens everywhere. It happens with Serena quite a bit….nothing new. Of course, not always easy to handle but has been happening since time immemorial.


calmdownplease Says:

Yes, and they got what THEY deserved also :)


Michael Says:

The crowd was shrieking, squealing, howling and whistling when Novak missed his first serve and applauded lustily when he netted a shot or hit them wide and yet despite the crowd being so much uncourteous and unruly to him during the course of the match has not provoked Novak to criticize their ridiculous behavior, but to only take it sportingly by acknowledging that Roger by his great standing in the game deserves all the crowd support he gets.

The sportsmanship behavior of Novak is once again brought to the fore !!


jane Says:

happy to see that so much press on the match is openly acknowledging the horrible behaviour of that crowd last night. kudos to them!


Ben Pronin Says:

I think the 3ish hour delay definitely played a role. Whether the fans were drunk or anxious or both. I don’t think it excuses the number of times they yelled during Djokovic’s toss, but it’s at least somewhat explained. Overall, Djokovic’s response is unbelievable by itself. I would’ve laid into the crowd for their behavior. I don’t know how this doesn’t win him some fans. The guy, much like the God-that-is Federer, is a class act.


Markus Says:

This is another aspect of Djokovic’s game that he has improved upon. He used to be negatively affected by the crowd when it cheers against him. He has gone past that and now can focus solidly on his game regardless of the environment. There seems to be no aspect of the game that he has not improved on. Very deserving of his accomplishments. He has evolved magnificently.


RZ Says:

Good attitude from Nole.

Players can’t control the crowd, so they shouldn’t worry about it and instead should concentrate on what they can control.


SG1 Says:

It’s easy to forget that Novak is a class act in his own right. These are Federer’s last kicks at the major championship can so it’s only normal that the crowd will to him.

Let’s also keep in mind that not every fan in the stadium was applauding double faults. There are always some idiots who do this kind of thing. Ultimately though, it was a much more partisan Federer crowd than anti-Novak crowd. The point by point nature of tennis makes it tough to for a crowd to always be fair. After all, an error, a double fault or whatever mistake by one player, by definition benefits the other player.

I think that when Novak gets close to the end of the road in his career, he will experience some of what Federer is getting now. It’s a cyclical thing. Federer is perhaps tennis’ most iconic figure of all time. I suspect that Novak will one day (at least from a numbers stand point), be pretty close to Roger and when he nears the end, he’ll have a rowdy NY crowd pulling for him.


SG1 Says:

In watching the match last night, I was speaking with my father and being somewhat critical of Roger not being aggressive enough in the last two sets. This being said, Novak has some defensive capabilities that I guess I hadn’t fully appreciated. Novak, when stretched out, can still hit an aggressive and accurate ball perhaps better than anyone who has ever played the game. It seemed like no matter how far Roger pulled Novak off the court to one side, Novak could still get back to the other side of the court and hit a big ball. Really impressive. When Serve & Volleyers have nightmares, it’s Novak they see.

Novak was a very deserving (…if not fully appreciated) champion yesterday and he has elevated himself to being one of the all time greats. Congratz to him, his team and his fans!


Ben Pronin Says:

SG1, Jason Goodall (best tennis analyst on TV right now) talked about that a bit before the match. He said one of Djokovic’s biggest strengths is being able to hit his backhand from a very defensive position in a powerful way. Whereas most players will resort to a slice, his balance and flexibility allow him to keep both hands on the racket.

I also agree with about about Federer not being aggressive enough. He’s down 2-5 in the fourth and FINALLY he decides to attack the net relentlessly? Where was that in the third set? I also definitely thought he could’ve attacked Djokovic’s second serves more, especially on all of those break points. But I think you were right in this scenario. Yeah Federer was able to employ the SABR in tight situations in Cincy. But he seemed to be scared to do it last night. I do hope that he sticks to it and plays with a bit less fear going forward.


Daniel Says:

Also his loobys were perfect. Those back to back were insane. His passing shots also, he finds the only spots to hit it and low balls to Fed feet to difcult the first volley also.

Maybe conditions affect it a bit because to me there were few aces by both compared to previous rounds. It was cooler, a bit more windy than the whole tournament.


Deborah Says:

Djokovic did try to “lay into” the crowd years ago when they got on him and it was an unmitigated PR disaster. He obviously learned that’s not the best way to handle the NY crowd. I’ve heard the argument that this is about folks responding to this stage of Roger’s career. That may be true for some, but a Roger has a bond with his fan international fan base that goes beyond his wins and losses. Yes, sports is all about wins and Roger has more than his share. But as he has acknowledged, just like he broke someone’s record, another player will do the same to his. What I doubt can be replicated, is the overwhelming and international fan base he has built.


Margot Says:

Lol Daniel, “loobys” what a splendid new stroke Nole has perfected.
Does sound a bit rude tho….


jane Says:

fed used the second serve attack, but he won only 50% of those points. now, players are expecting that shot/technique, and novak was ready with responses: lobs (loobys ;))and passers.

also someone did an analysis of fed’s use of that “sabr” strategy before the final; he had used it 17 times but won only 7 of the points for a 41% success rate.

maybe fed was hesitant to use it on those crucial break points because novak set the tone by lobbing fed perfectly two times in a row? maybe fed was thiking it wasnt a go-to strategy right then and trusted his forehand more?

people always say how “badly” fed plays in the finals versus novak. they talk about how his serve hadn’t been broken, how he hadn’t lost any sets, etc, prior to the final, and then chastise fed for not playing well.

but the truth is that novak has played fed 42 times and has an excellent return. he naturally gets into more of fed’s service games.

also worth noting: novak has one of the better second serves on tour – much better than gasquet’s or even stan’s,whose are attackable – so it’s not as easy to attack novak’s serves and automatically say fed should’ve broken. have a look in matchfacts for who has saved the most bps.

finally, novak makes fed run. there was an analysis done of how much fed had run up to the final, and then how much he ran in the final (which was only one more set than prev matches), and he ran *way more* in the final. it was the same at wimbledon too. thus, by the third set, maybe fed’s legs are tired, which might explain why he misses more and doesnt capitalize more? maybe he doesnt feel up to eplosive forays to the net? i dunno. just a thought.

usually fed starts strong. i thought last night he was a bit tentative in the first set. he had a momentum shift when novak slipped but it was novak who came out and immediately put fed’s serve under pressure. winning the first set was/is crucial in their rivalry, esp for fed.


chris ford1 Says:

Deborah “Djokovic did try to “lay into” the crowd years ago when they got on him and it was an unmitigated PR disaster. He obviously learned that’s not the best way to handle the NY crowd.”

==================
One reaction is global, the other by wealthy NYC Metro Area congregants. Roddick started it by openly attacking Djokivic in a post game talk on court, accusing Djokovic of malingering and phony disease excuses. (we now know there was mostly truth to his health woes.) Nole’s response was to humiliate Roddick to rage and beat him badly. Then lash out in the same setting Roddick used to say he didn’t like the lies.
USO fans having a healthy contingent of A-holes, they then booed him up and down, which visibly perturbed Nole.
“How DARE he attack our nations best player and do so in the Center of the Universe – Murica and the Greatest City Evah!!!”.
Rest of the world not loving Murica and NYC as much….many liked Djokovic standing up for himself and people of all the little nations America has bombed..
If Djokovic ends up being hated in Madrid and NYC but liked or tolerated everywhere else, that is a pretty good deal. I’d take it. Screw decaying NYC and jobless Madrid.


peter Says:

Fed could have done something to stop the crowd, he didnt. He was happy to have his fans clapping and shouting when nole misses a shot or tries to serve.

Not classy, but definitely an actor.

A true gentlemen would have seen the issue and politely ask his fans to stop.


Markus Says:

@peter, that would be a first, a player (individual or team sport) telling his supporters to stop. Sometimes it’s good to use a little bit of common sense before posting for the public to read. Nobody wants to be looked at as a dunce.


Tennisfan Says:

You guys are mean. I enjoyed the US when I visited there. I stayed in Nashville for two months and the Americans were very nice and not at all obnoxious. Every country has their rednecks (we call them “bogans” in Aus), but that doesn’t mean the majority of the people are like that.
Its sad Novak isn’t as popular as Fedal despite achieving feats similar to them. Unfortunately, I think he’s got his team to blame for a lot of that. Early in his career it was his parents and right now its Boris who run their mouths off making inflammatory comments about his biggest rivals and it ends up reflecting on Novak himself.
Nole has generally maintained a classy, respectable demeanor- its unfortunate his team members can’t seem to do the same.


mat4 Says:

TF:

Don’t be naive. The popularity of the players depends mostly of the corporate media, and they depend, in turn, of the sponsors. Had Novak been from a rich and big country (e.g. Chinese), had he immediately sign with IMG, he would have been immensely popular. IMG formed the public image of both Fed and Rafa around some traits of their personality.

Federer, a flamboyant personality, has been remodelled in a more classical fashion. Rafa, the most traditional personality possible, has been disguised in “rebel”, “pirate”…

Time and time again, I read about the “robotic” nature of Novak’s exceptional and acrobatic game… What a nonsense. What should we say about Rafa’s game?

Murray, who plays a very similar game as Novak, is qualified as “very talented”, while Novak isn’t… even when experts don’t agree — Peter Fleming even refused to compare those two players lately on Sky, saying bluntly that Djokovic was by far the better player while commenting a match.


peter Says:

@Markus

Well if u see a fan of u do something that is bad, u should tell him to stop. Simple as that.

But of course he wouldnt.

Fed would be praised as most sportsmanlike act ever if he did.


Noonen Says:

Why was the New York crowd so biased toward Federer? People lift up and cheer on those who are like them. Not all Christians are the same. Paul was no ordinary believer. It is the same with sinners. Some are more sold out to sin than others. Federer is such a person. Not only did he use Mirka for five years before she stopped taking birth control pills, he is using her still. There is no love there. Djokovic is more tender-hearted. He is less like the riotous New York crowd.


Tennisfan Says:

mat4, yeah fair point the media definitely influences popularity.
I still can’t help but think it was Novak’s parents and their “king is dead” schtick which really damaged his image right as he was breaking out. First impressions stick unfortunately, and I still hear many casual fans call Djokovic arrogant based on those few incidences.


Markus Says:

@Peter: So, in the middle of a match like the finals of the US Open, while he was having difficulty against Djokovic, Federer should have stopped worrying about his game and seek out those “bad” fans and teach them some manners. Great advice and very simple indeed. As in only a simpleton would do that. You’ll make a good coach Peter.


Wog Boy Says:

” still can’t help but think it was Novak’s parents and their “king is dead” schtick which really damaged his image right as he was breaking out.”
Nonsense, those “fans” who disrespected Nole and tennis by screaming in the middle of the ball toss or cheering double foults don’t have a clue about what Nole did or what Nole’s mother said in 2008, they don’t know what they had for the lunch yesterday, their behavior showed they are not tennis fans, just bunch of idiots who came to have a fun and who came to watch tennis and disrupt one player as much as they possibly could. I have never seen such behavior in IW, Miami or Cinncinati and they are Americans too.


Wog Boy Says:

^^ The closest I seen to this was 2014 Basel and huge disrespect that Swiss fans showed towards one of the nicest guys on tour Ivo Karlovic in his match against Roger, that was even worst in one way.


Wog Boy Says:

^^ one more thing, those “fans” at USO did the same to Monfils last year agains Roger (surprise surprise) and he or his team (family) never said or did anything to stirr them, I really felt sorry for Monfils last year, he had a match in his hands but was visibly distracted by the very same “fans” and lost it. It is simply a patern when Roger plays in NY.


skeezer Says:

jane,
Agreed, the first set was crucial. Fed came out very flat, first serve % very low. Thought that was the match right there. If Fed squeaked out the first, his chances of winning the day were good. Se la vi.


skeezer Says:

Thought Nole explained the crowd accurately and graciously. Not like some of the delusional here, who seem a touch over protective. In the end, if you want crowd support( I think he does ), you have to earn it, like he said. I Maybe one day he’ll get there.


elina Says:

no “ifs” in tennis or so I’ve heard.

Can’t recall who said it. :)


Giles Says:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/14/magazine/why-cant-novak-djokovic-get-some-respect.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=1
Poor joker, no love, no respect. They say one has to earn these sentiments, no?
I guess crowds still remember his shirt ripping barbaric behaviour. Will never be forgotten.


Giles Says:

elina. It was Rafa.


Okiegal Says:

I don’t agree that it’s the corporate media that makes old “Joe Blow” popular, it’s each player’s emotionally charged adoring millions of fans that makes each one popular…..I quit watching tennis after Pete. Then one day channel surfing I came across this kid from Spain winning his first TO. Trust me on this, the pirate gear did nothing for me but his passion for the game turned me on. Have been watching him ever since…..Oh how I dread the thoughts of him retiring, but it’s coming, sad to say.

@Mat4 9:51…….Did I understand your comment to read how I responded?? Sometimes I will take a comment to mean something else than what the writer meant to convey…..if so, my pardon.


Okiegal Says:

Oops, not first TO but first FO….Lol..I’m sure my astute fellow posters who may or may not follow Rafa knew what I meant……… :)


jane Says:

i’d say it’s both.
serious tennis fans find their faves in the way you describe okie.
but i do think the casual observers and the people who get tickets to big sporting events only know of the biggest “stories”.

it’s like me with basketball. i know nothing of the sport. don’t follow it. don’t care. but i have heard of lebron james (sponsored by nike). or same with golf; i know only about tiger woods (sponsored by nike), and his scandal. as well as that dude who practically left woz at the altar.

so to casual “fans” or non-fans who have money to go see a final, i think it IS the corporate media who – at least partly – shapes who they cheer for.

it’s also achievements; all those people i’ve named have been successful in their fields, which garners “general” recognition as well. so it’s a sort of feedback loop.


Tennisfan Says:

@Wog Boy If you read my comment earlier, I was clearly talking about Novak’s popularity in general compared to Fedal, not about the NYC crowd.
It’s obvious to anyone that the crowd were shamelessly cheering for Fed to win as always and would’ve behaved that way regardless of who was playing against him.


calmdownplease Says:

Jeez, there sure is a LOT whiney Djokovic fans all crying their asses off etc
But, wait a minute!
He’s just won his tenth slam!
Cheer the f**k up b**ches!
All this playing the victim card, so boring.
Oh and Mat4, I’d like to see where Fleming actually said Novak was better than Andy `by far`.
Maybe better, but not by far.
Fleming’s quite a bit smarter than that!


Margot Says:

@CDP
Or even “better mentally” which no-one can deny….alas.


calmdownplease Says:

No, one can deny that one!
I wouldn’t quite put him up with Borg or Nadal on that but he’s not far off!
As for Andy and this, thought wise, well I tend kind of leave the room and fix myself a nice drink instead
:)


Markus Says:

Definitely, the big corporations can help the image of the player they sponsor but only up to a certain extent but the player has to have some charisma or likability factor. The media can maximize this by good publicity, teaching them on how to conduct themselves (talking, dressing, etc) and playing down whatever is negative.

The misfortune of Djokovic is that he came at a time when Federer and Nadal have already been established as the two main guys in tennis. They were/are both so good and appealing and too often the only guys you see standing at the end of each tournament. They seemed to be the only choice. They already have legions of loyal fans which makes it hard for Djokovic to wrestle that adulation from them. Novak’s parents’ behavior did not help. His frail constitution early in his career which led to many retirements to the game were also negative aspects. Federer and Nadal did not have those problems. Their parents were quiet and gave them a nice family picture which the public likes. If you look at the Federer/Nadal boxes, they are full of nice and beautiful people. Early in Djokovic’s career, you see his parents cheering like mad for Novak. They were eye sores. I am sure his sponsors told them to stop attending that’s why we don’t see them anymore.


calmdownplease Says:

The marketing machine is behind Federer and it will stay that way until he retires
And then Novak will probably start to get some love then…


calmdownplease Says:

The marketing machine is behind Federer and it will stay that way until he retires
And then Novak will probably start to get some love then…


calmdownplease Says:

don’t know what happened there :)


jane Says:

that’s true markus. another factor is being “the third wheel.”


SG1 Says:

One of the things that makes the US Open so much fun is the fan engagement and interaction. Particularly during night matches. As a player you need to learn to take the good with the bad. New Yorkers love their champions. Often to a fault.

I remember Connors playing Agassi and one guy from the crowd yelling out, “Come on Jimmy! He’s a punk, you’re a legend!” To perfectly honest, I though it was hysterical. Connors was smiling from ear to ear. I know that Connors wasn’t the most classy guy on a tennis court. But he could appreciate the crowd for what it was.

Does everyone really want the homogeneous (…boring…yawn) crowd full of politically correct automatons? Variety is the spice of life and New York and the New York crowd bring Cayenne pepper to the tennis table. As a player, I’d think you’d want the crowd engaged. It adds energy and excitement to the whole experience. I think that you have to let people be who they are. They are the paying fans after all and there wouldn’t be any tennis tournaments (or $3.3M pay checks) without them.


Purcell Says:

It was clear from the offset that Fed was not going to win. He looked nervous, his head was down and he lacked control over many shots. He was simply outplayed, full stop. I was mildly disappointed that 18 didn’t happen but at the end of the day that’s not what counts for me. It’s the way he moves, strikes the ball seemingly effortlessly, produces all court tennis, conjures astounding shots etc etc etc……Each time he plays it gives me joy, yes, even when he loses and I want him to continue buzzing around the circuit like an annoying mosquito for as long as he sees fit. Let me put it this way: Federer plays tennis, the others knock a ball around. (Runs for life.)
Regarding the crowd, Roger during his early days got plenty of antagonism from crowds, eg US Agassi 2005 and also when he became a serial winner and people were beginning to tire of aforesaid.
For once I partly agree with CF regarding the Roddick debacle. However neither Novak nor his parents had done themselves any favours prior to that, what with N’s regular spells of erm…illness and the parents questionable comments and behaviour. Regarding the latter I felt that mum & dad were just overjoyed at son’s success and perhaps a little naive in their behaviour but after witnessing their barracking of Federer when they shouted in to a shot that he’s said was in I felt a little less well disposed to them as I would have done if they had tried the same with any other player.
Did I feel sorry for Nole regarding the crowd’s behaviour? No. Why? After his restrained pointy pointy and hand shake he spoils it by spending an inordinate amount of time in and around his box leaving the vanquished opponent and the organisers to suck eggs. I wouldn’t deny anyone the right to celebrate but for God’s sake do it thoughtfully.I’ve always thought this box climbing undignified and disrespectful especially when followed by a smarmy love fest for your opponent.


Brando Says:

‘but the player has to have some charisma or likability factor’:

^This!

I think the truth is that beyond the records, being big corporate figures:

Fedal just have more oncourt charisma than the other big names. It’s as simple as that.

It’s EASY to see why Federer is popular. The elegant style with which he plays is a automatic fan gainer.

It’s EASY to see why Rafa is so popular. The animal like energy he brings to the court, the panache, the electricity etc: it’s EASY to see how he rivals Federer in the popularity stakes.

Those 2 have been blessed with a oncourt charisma that really others just do not have. Add in the fact that they are eminently likeable: well the deal is done.

Novak and Andy are class acts. But when it comes down to it: their games do not have the wow factor to the extent that Fedal does. They have appeal as otherwise they would have zero fans, but really their game is not as magnetic as those 2.

It’s not their fault. Like Michael Caine one said:

There can be many brilliant actors. But not everyone can have the charisma, appeal of Jack Nicholson.

I think Federer and Rafa were born with a gift that automatically draws many in.


SG1 Says:

Ben Pronin Says:

Yeah Federer was able to employ the SABR in tight situations in Cincy. But he seemed to be scared to do it last night. I do hope that he sticks to it and plays with a bit less fear going forward.

—————————

I think that Federer does not hit the ball flat enough when he attacks so the ball doesn’t shoot through the court as quickly as he needs it to. Particularly against Novak. This leaves Novak with a slightly higher ball and one that he has just a little more time to get to.

I’m not sure if you see what I’m seeing or not. Just an opinion. I think he needs to hit approach shots that stay lower and scoot through the court a little more quickly. Today’s racket and string technologies do have a propensity for generating loads of spin. But, spin can be a detriment when trying to shorten points and attack the net.

Just my opinion but I wonder if Roger would consider some different strings when playing Novak.


Markus Says:

… and then there’s Edberg in Roger’s box, neat, good looking, quiet, very well behaved vs Novak’s Becker looking pudgy like a drunk dirty old man with a tendency to mouth off non-sensical stuff to the press.


calmdownplease Says:

`Novak and Andy are class acts. But when it comes down to it: their games do not have the wow factor to the extent that Fedal does. They have appeal as otherwise they would have zero fans, but really their game is not as magnetic as those 2..`

In other words Brando you are a fedal fan..
It’s not a big deal and you are of course welcome to your opinion.
I’ll be honest on my opinion about Nadal’s tennis
I personally find it virtually unwatchable.
There I’ve said it, unless he is in a big match esp against someone with a bit more variety. And the fist pumps and the eeehhhs! do nothing for me either.
Clay is a boring surface for me too.
I wont get started on Fed as it would be like bashing a older person for their pension
Champions come and go…..
The march of time and that..


SG1 Says:

I also think that Federer was a little unlucky with the weather as well. Warmer and drier weather would have helped his serve and some of his other shots. I think he was a little gun shy to attack after those two lobs went over his head but I believe that this may not have happened in warmer conditions. Then again, who knows? Federer couldn’t beat Novak on grass either and grass is the surface that best suits Federer when playing Novak. It may just be Novak’s time to shine and he’s doing it well. No reason to believe he can’t win another couple of slams next year.


Purcell Says:

Sorry Markus, I’ve only just read you comments above. I seem to have repeated or reiterated what you have written (with knobs on.)


SG1 Says:

Markus Says:
… and then there’s Edberg in Roger’s box, neat, good looking, quiet, very well behaved vs Novak’s Becker looking pudgy like a drunk dirty old man with a tendency to mouth off non-sensical stuff to the press.

————-

Quite true…LOL


Purcell Says:

CDP: oh go on, start on Fed. I’m curious.


brando Says:

@CDP: lmao. Sure I am, but really the appeal I think is easy to see: I don’t like Tom cruise, leonardo DiCaprio as actors at all. Think both are awful. But I can easily see why they and not a favourite like Joaquin Phoenix are megastars. Those 2 have a charisma my favourite does not. That simple. I think with fed and rafa the appeal is very easy. I mean: even with the tour they are the most popular. Andy even calls rafa his favourite player to watch. Roger always gets love too. Ultimately: even Boris Becker said it publicly: the game needs Federer and Nadal since once they go, the decline in tennis will start since there are no stars to take their place. He said we don’t know how good we got it with these 2 since when they are gone the reality will become clearer. Heck: I even remember when both rafael and Roger pulled out of Miami masters the tournament director stated publicly how big a hit it is to their event. These 2 connect with the public in a manner that many few do in other sports, entertainment fields. It is what it is.


calmdownplease Says:

Well…Purcell I dunno..
But as you have asked!
To start I suppose I could stick a toe in the water and laugh a bit about his strange `goblinesque` demeanour
And then Maybe afterwards mention something about Halloween and, you know, tat I hope his test tube babies haven’t gotten their looks from either of their PARENTS
but rather the test tubes.
Actually, I could go on for years about him and yes Rafa (and Andy actually too)
But then I am a nasty ba*tard..


calmdownplease Says:

`the game needs Federer and Nadal since once they go..`

So I hear at all times, but it has less resonance with me now..
And still Nadal and Roger have still been around,
but in decline and it’s not the best look at all
I think Rafa is just too young to be written off quite yet.
But lace curtains from Grandmama may need to be drawn down on old Fed pretty soon.
Sigh!
Realistically the marketeers have built up a product (Fed and fedal) so much and not really though about whats round the corner
But the machine will turn on Andy and Novak eventually
Its just the way it works
But not for a good few years yet.
So Novak should just relax about it, like his fans should too.


brando Says:

“it’s not the best look at all”: I agree. Its not a good luck for the sport that the biggest names today are not the most dominant. But as Becker said: who else there to fill in their shoes? Truth is: I think fedal are an unusual boom for tennis. Once they go, there will be a bust until someone new comes in. You can see already many are hoping krygios, coric is that guy. As far as Novak: I think he should forget it. He’s 29 in May, won 10 slams. IF he ain’t getting that fedal love when will he? Just look at how popular fedal were at that same age, stage in career. IF I were him: I’d forget about it and just stick to my business. And I think he is. I think he used to care alot about it. But now he’s moved on from it.


jalep Says:

My early money was going to be on 17 yr old Andrey Rublev, diamond in the rough, guessing, until read about his Boy Band aspirations.

I give up.


Margot Says:

@brando
Trouble is….when you blow up Fedal as much as the media does, what happens when the Golden Geese stop laying?
Will the popularity of tennis, already a minority sport, take a further nose-dive and become even more marginal?
In the dusty corners of remote channel 4576100 will we search, or even, in the UK, maybe “Dave.”
What a horrible thought indeedy!


courbon Says:

Jalep, what you have against Boy Bands?????
They bring poetry to the lyrics, amazing musical skills,originality and true Art…

nah, just kidding. In my imaginary country where I’m big dictator, first thing I would do is ban the Boy Bands.Probably also send Mariah Carey to Labour Camp ( I know it sounds extreme, but that’s what good and respectful dictators do! )


courbon Says:

J Kath: Still can’t find that pen…


Markus Says:

It looks like tennis will go into a bleak phase once Federer and Nadal (and to a certain degree, Djokovic and Murray). There isn’t anybody in the horizon with the game and the personality to attract fans the way Fedal have. He has to be both good and with universal appeal. With predecessors like Federer and Nadal, just about everybody will fall short. Djokovic and Murray will carry the torch in the interim but not as brilliantly as Fedal.


J-Kath Says:

@ Courbon – I was always advised that:

(a) I’m a member of the government – you can trust me
and/or
(b) I’m here to save you money
(c) The cheque is in the post.

Now it’s a (d) —so I’ll buy it – you are off the hook – all you have to do now is live with your conscience (or I’ll tell your son what a rotten Dad. he has……..


Markus Says:

missing tlast 2 words in the first sentence: are gone.


jalep Says:

ah hahahaaaaaaa
Nariah Carey to a labor camp…wheezing and coughing, laughing.

I’m your faithful assistant in your new world dictatorship…


jalep Says:

in reply to courbon @ 2:36 pm


courbon Says:

J Kath- You can tell my son! I don’t care
( because I have two lovely girls (-:)

Jalep: Great! You can be a Minister of (Dis)Information or Minister of Culture..;what ever you fancy-It’s dictatorship on the end of the day, so we can do what we like! ( Maybe we should also ban Clay Courts in tennis, just to piss off Nadal and his Nadal’s fans! That would be hilarious! )


Gypsy Gal Says:

Courbon lol i could go off you :)….


Wog Boy Says:

^^ is their room for me in your government, I can be pretty loyal..to certain degree..


Gypsy Gal Says:

Courbon Mariah Carrey needs arresting for crimes against music,polution of the air waves,and take away all those boy and girl bands with her too….


Margot Says:

Courbon: David Cameron has been on the phone to me. He wants you in his government. You have just the right (wing) attitude.
Corbyn just said , “no thanks.”


J-Kath Says:

Courbon – Ahha – now I’ve got it in writing!!!!

I give up ……..hugs to you and your two lovely girls


courbon Says:

Gypsy:Ok, you can run Health service for me, and as favour I will put all immportant Pagan happening as bank Hollidays

Wog Boy: I thought about you-you are Minister for police and Army

Margot: Cameron? He is pussycat, too soft…
Talking about Corbyn- I just read what he stand for, his ideas and I like it a lot.But in reality, it would not work.Too much bussines money controls goverements


courbon Says:

J-Kath:Thank you-good night


Wog Boy Says:

Courbon, can you give minister of police portfolio to somebody else, I spend all my life building reputation on the other side of the fence, I don’t want to ruin my reputation now when I am nearing winter of my life. Army is fine, I was corporal in JNA (federal army), so i have a knowledge and. Can handle it, I am sure that I will be better than certain corporal;)


jane Says:

margot @ 1:42, precisely. it could be a conundrum when all the eggs are put into one or two baskets.

look what happened on the women’s side. when serena lost, ticket sales dropped drastically, and ratings probably dropped, too. i.e., even the business side of the sport was affected. serena winning the calendar slam had been almost all the WTA had promoted ALL year, and the us open even more so, since it was both the ultimate slam and american, so when two (wonderful but largely uncelebrated) italians made the final a lot of people lost interest.

which is a shame. it was a fabulous final, with play filled with variety and a ceremony full of love and joy. i’ll not soon forget it, but as it was playing out, these boards were a ghost-town.
sad, really.

i think we could see similar in men’s tennis because 2 (or maybe 3 or 4) “stars” have dominating and been promoted so heavily that non-devoted tennis fans know of hardly anyone else.

look at last year’s us open final as an example.

the people promoting tennis – the ATP, the ITF, the tournaments, the media – should not be so narrow in their persepctives, or so biased. it’s bizarre to me that i can name almost every tennis writer’s favourite, be he/she from tennis.com or espn, or si.com, or the telegraph, or the new york times. (9 times out of 10 it’s one of 2 players).


courbon Says:

Wog Boy-Ok, you will be Marshall then. I think CDP has good attitude to be Interior Minister.
By the way, our basket team is doing quite well ( and my Frechies ). Did you watch anything?


J-Kath Says:

Gosh Margot – Your subject matter is tempting -I’m a Speaker’s Corner groupie – I joined the Hyde Park anti-war Iraq march – I’ve a feeling that our politics won’t be as united as our joint hopes/views on Andy.


Wog Boy Says:

Thanks my beloved Dictator.

Yes, I watched two games while in Belgrade, against Spain and Turkey, it is always nice feeling when we kick their backsides, as we promptly did:) I would put France as the favorite to win European championship.


courbon Says:

Wog Boy, yep I think French are favorites.
I our team that guy with beard looks scary…


Gypsy Gal Says:

Courbon LOL Pagan holidays on bank holidays,dancing naked around camp fires etc….


Wog Boy Says:

Courbon, you mean Miroslav Raduljica? I love him, look at him, isn’t he cute;), he is #13:

http://youtu.be/KHGc_ES6F0w


courbon Says:

Yeah, thats the gyy.My French mates are scared off him! Seriously!

Gypsy, what are frends for?


Margot Says:

@Kath
Was on that one too. Surprised I didn’t see you..;)
Me? Somewhere so far left I am a speck on the horizon.


Purcell Says:

CDP: goblinesque? Gnomes of Zurich perhaps?

Top story: Halep, Wozniacki Lead Loaded Wuhan Field; Kerber v Keys, Svitolina v Sabalenka Tues.