Eugenie Bouchard And Coach Nick Saviano Split
by Tom Gainey | November 25th, 2014, 10:13 am
  • 22 Comments

After a breakthrough season, WTA sensation Eugenie Bouchard is making changes. The 20-year-old is already shopping for a new agency to represent her, and now she’ll also be looking for a new coach this offseason.

Via a press release, longtime Bouchard coach announced his split with the Canadian.

“Genie and I have decided that it is best for us to end our player-coach relationship and to move in different directions for 2015. Helping Genie grow from an ambitious 12-year-old to No. 5 in the world has been an exciting journey,” said Saviano who had worked with Bouchard for eight years.

“This past year traveling with Genie to all of the majors has been a wonderful experience with memories I will cherish for a lifetime. I have no doubt that Genie will accomplish great things. I wish her all the best.”

The 58-year-old Saviano has been a part of coaching in American tennis for over 30 years.

Bouchard, who reached a career-high No. 5 in the WTA rankings, has not commented on the split.


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22 Comments for Eugenie Bouchard And Coach Nick Saviano Split

Frankie Says:

Any takers?


TennisVagabond.com Says:

Yeah, what the heck. I’m in.


elina Says:

I’m still updating my resume as I don’t have the job just yet! Please relax Genie fans.


SG1 Says:

I live about 15 minutes from her parent’s house in Westmount. If tennis weren’t such an international sport, I’d send in my resume.


SG1 Says:

I think letting Saviano go isn’t necessarily being done because of something he did wrong. She’s been with him a long time and the ideas can get a little stale. Some fresh eyes can often be helpful when trying to move to the next level. Coaching changes have helped Sampras, Agassi, Murray and even Federer. Genie has some limits to her game and a new coach may be able to help with those limits. I know these are unlikely candidates but I’d like to see her choose Martina Navratilova or Monica Seles as a coach.


RZ Says:

Interesting that the two most improved players of 2014 – Bouchard and Halep – have split with the coaches who helped them with their breakthroughs this year.


TennisVagabond.com Says:

RZ, I think this is rather the norm: players grow up with a coach, and when they become professional mainstays, for a number of possible reasons, there is a break-up and the player moves on to a new coach. Probably some have already down this by the time they are competing in the Jr ranks, so when they turn pro they already have been with a “pro” coach.
I think Novak would be the exception, sticking with his long time coach.


RZ Says:

@TV – it does seem to be the norm these days. You mention Novak as an exception; I would add Rafa too.


Wog Boy Says:

Vajda is Nole’s fourth coach, he started with Nole when Nole was 19 years of age and already on pro tour. It was Jelena Gencic, Niki Pilic, Riccardo Piatti and then Vajda and then Boris.


jane Says:

^ i noticed you skipped todd martin (probably because of the traumatic memory of seeing nole practicing serves … on his knees! no wonder he was the double fault king in 2010!!)


Wog Boy Says:

jane, actually I forgot about him alltogether, selective memory, no? :)

When we are talking about Todd Martin I don’t think it is fair to blame him solely for Nole stagnation, in those years Nole was distracted by quite a few things and had a big burden on his back ti carry, it was to much of everything for the young man who was just trying to play tennis, besides, Todd looked like a really nice bloke.


Wog Boy Says:

^^too much


jane Says:

yes, i liked todd martin as a player, and i definitely think he meant well – lovely guy. i think nole has also changed his racquet around then which caused some problems.

i think he worked briefly with todd woodbridge too, to help the volleys, but i think we’ve seen the biggest improvement in those since boom-boom because his coach; would you agree?


jane Says:

too many “thinks” ha ha.


Wog Boy Says:

todd woodbridge, yes, I forgot him too…looks like I am socializing too much with that Alzheimer dude, lately.


jane Says:

ha ha ha, lol wog boy.


andrea Says:

she should hire chris evert….she’s a huge fan of genie. that would be a great combo.


Tmd Says:

I thought Nole worked Mark Woodforde, not Todd.


Wog Boy Says:

^^^ Blame jane..:)


Wog Boy Says:

I don’t know where to put this, this looks like the most neutral thread, Wimbledon final has been declared by ATP as the best GS match of the year, second best is Wawrinka/Djokovic AO.


Brando GOAT Poster Says:

The best match of the year- by a clear distance- was Wawrinka v Djokovic at AO.

A match in which throughout it all you saw 2 evenly stacked opponents going toe to toe with one not knowing who would win until the distant end.

For me- a neutral- the wimbledon final is grossly overrated. Sorry.

Novak could have- and should have- won that match in straight sets. No question about it.

Fed was at the mercy of his racquet and the real reason why that matched extended as long as it did was quite simply:

Novak struggling with his nerve.

Call it mental frailty, choking, whatever but it was blatant that Novak’s biggest opponent in that match was his mental demons as when he was dialed in the superior player was quite apparent.

Unlike Novak’s reaction post AO 12′ final or Rafa post Wimby 08′, rather than pure elation at the win his reaction summed it up best for me:

Pure relief that he did not let that match slip away.

He did well to win in the end since he had to face his mental demons in that one more than an opponent who was playing superior tennis.

Should have wrapped it in 3, certainly 4.

My 2 cents on that one.

Wawa v Nole will live long in the memory though since it was a genuine classic.


jane Says:

tmd, you’re probably right. i just know he worked with one of them on his net game quite a few years back.

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